Don’t forget about HR

When many of us think about companies that have made big HR mistakes, we’re quick to jump to the assumption that it’s all the fault of greedy bosses who are more interested in lining their own pockets than doing the right thing by their loyal employees.

Mistakes with administrative processes that result in employees receiving their wages far later than expected.

Employees forced to give up their holiday entitlement because of a last-minute crisis.

Disgruntled employees who are vocal about their negative experiences at work.

The list goes on and there’s no smoke without fire right?

Not always.

Employment legislation exists for a reason, and for the greater good. As an employer, you have a responsibility to make sure that you’re compliant and you’re implementing the best working practices to create an environment that’s fair and nurturing for your employees.

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However, mistakes can happen, and even the most dedicated and ethical employers can find themselves facing extremely difficult circumstances.

When your business is growing fast, and you have a million and one things to balance, you can take your eye off the ball. You can overlook important details. And you can find yourself facing circumstances that you never imagined, but which can put your entire business in jeopardy.

So at this stage, it is imperative what you do next and how you decide to put things right.

If you’re worried that there could be an HR nightmare on the horizon, then we can help. We can assess your current circumstances, and help you to create an action plan that gets things back on the right track as quickly as possible, with the least amount of fuss.

We’re not here to judge – we’re passionate about getting things right, and we understand the challenges that you’re facing. Get in touch: +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

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How to manage football fever in the workplace…

Whether you love it or hate it, there’s no escaping from football at the minute. The FIFA World Cup 2018 has begun in Russia and apparently Goldman Sachs have devised an algorithm that says Brazil will win, so let’s hope that you’ve picked them in a sweep-stake!!!

England played their first game yesterday evening winning 2-1 (opinions are divided as to how well they played…. especially here at the HRREV offices!).

So between now and 15th July, when the tournament draws to a close, there’ll be some key considerations that you’ll have to make to ensure that it’s business as usual in your workplace, as far as possible.

And lets not forget Wimbledon too!! So here, we tell you what you need to know.

Be flexible wherever possible

Trying to bury your head in the sand is very rarely a good idea. Acknowledge that the football is a topical issue at the moment, and that you may well have employees who want to tune into the games. Consider reworking your timetables to accommodate any requested time off, or make provisions for watching big matches in your office environment.

Operational requirements should always be at the top of your agenda, but if you’re organised, it’s very possible to offer a degree of flexibility without it having an impact on productivity and output. In fact, you’re likely to find that it will boost morale and motivation, which is always a positive thing.

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Always apply your existing people policies

You don’t have to start from scratch and create a policy that handles the implications of sporting events. It’s very likely that everything you need will already be covered in your current policies and practices, including provisions around annual leave, sickness absence, and alcohol in the workplace.

If you suspect that your documentation is no longer fit for purpose, or that changes need to be made to ensure that you’re compliant with relevant legislation and best practice, then take this as you cue for getting things sorted.

Consider your stance on social media usage

Social media usage is another consideration that you may well already have covered within your existing policies. It’s a relatively new issue though, and it’s important to consider the fact that your employees may be turning to social platforms and online news sources to stay up to date with the latest scores and commentary.

A web use policy should encompass what’s acceptable and what isn’t, and it should be very clearly communicated to all employees. Remember to keep things fair. It wouldn’t be a good idea, for example, to allow football fans to use social media during Russia 2018, and apply a blanket ban on usage for other reasons. Remember that not everyone is interested in the game!

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In just a couple of weeks, football will become a distant memory for many people. In the here and now though, it’s important that you consider your role as a leader and ensure that problems and issues are sidestepped wherever possible.

Not to offend any of our colleagues or clients but…. COME ON ENGLAND!

If you need any other pointers do give HR Revolution a call and see how we could help: +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

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5 steps to help manage difficult employees

A difficult employee in any business will reduce productivity, have a negative impact  and potentially upset other colleagues too. So the quicker you can resolve the problem, the better your business will do.

If you let things slide for too long and just don’t act, you will miss important opportunities, waste time and probably money, that you simply can’t regain.

Also remember employees will be looking to you, to see how you manage the situation. Action’s speak louder than words and your action’s send a message to every employee, however any lack of any action sends an even more powerful one.

Perhaps what seemed to be an impressive characteristic during the interview stage has proved to be negative as the months have gone by?  or maybe an experience in your employee’s personal life has changed their behaviour at work?

On the other hand, could a series of small difficulties be starting to mount and cause concern.

Below we have listed 5 tips to help when you’re managing difficult employees in the workplace.

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1. Clear communication

Always give your employee the benefit of the doubt. They may not realise that they’re causing difficulties.

It’s also possible that they know things aren’t going well, but they’re struggling to improve the situation.

Be prepared to listen to their viewpoint. Take time to ask how they’re feeling and to find out what’s going on in their lives. Are they having trouble with their workload? Are there frictions between multiple employees? Is something outside the workplace having an impact on performance or behaviour?

Share the experience from your side, without being overly critical or apportioning blame on your employee. It’s important that they know what difficulties you’re facing as their manager, but accusations will not go down well.

When communicating, it’s important that you’re clear about exactly where the problem lies. Is their performance below the required standard, or is there a specific behaviour that’s becoming a concern? Work with your employee to find ways to improve the situation.

When you listen to a difficult employee, you can often turn things around. Equally as important, you might discover legitimate complaints that you can act on for the good of your business.

2. Always keep a written record

Written records benefit everyone.

If you need to take disciplinary action, it’s essential that you’ve got examples to back up your decision.

Write down any instances of difficult behaviour. Who was involved? What happened? What effect did it have?

You can use your records if you need to take formal steps, but should also be able to refer to them when speaking with the employee in question.

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3. Always refer to your handbooks and HR policies

Every workplace should have handbooks and policies that detail what’s expected of an employee, and it’s essential that everyone has access to these at all times. Storing them within your online HR software is the most effective way to reach every person in the workplace, and to keep everything up to date.

4. Know when to seek advice

Managing a difficult employee is a challenge. Their behaviour will almost certainly be having an impact on their colleagues, and the business as a whole.

Unless you’ve been through it before, it’s like that you will not know how to deal with a difficult worker. What are you allowed to do, and what might cause more trouble?  Even if you’ve been managing difficult employees in the workplace before, these specific concerns might be different.

Don’t be afraid to seek help and advice, whether that’s from another member of the management team or an external HR consultant.

5. Keep going

It’s all too easy to speak to a an employee, tell them that their behaviour isn’t acceptable and then forget to follow things up. Much like being a parent, threatening “I’m going to count to 10…” and having no plan for what happens afterwards.  After you’ve counted to 10, it’s vital that you make another move.

If you provide a warning and the behaviour continues and you don’t take further action, your initial conversation is wasted. You’ll probably need to start again further down the line or even worse, you send a message that you are inconsistent and that your threats are meaningless.

If you need help give HR Revolution a call: +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

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Is your HR planning on track?

You might have blinked and missed the first quarter of 2018 and while it may seem like five minutes have passed since you mapped out your big goals at the end of last year, it’s actually a good time to stop, take stock and refocus.

Ask yourself honestly, have you successfully met your HR obligations during the first quarter, or are you lagging behind? Of course it’s undeniable that other things can get in the way, but if you want to be compliant and you want your business to thrive, then it’s absolutely vital that you take time to get your people practices right.

Need some pointers around where to get started? Here’s our checklist for assessing whether your HR planning is on track.

1. Have you made provisions for new legislation?

It can be hard to keep up with changes in employment law, but it’s absolutely non-negotiable. Neglect this area and your business could seriously pay the price, you must regularly be pinpointing relevant changes, and making adjustments to your policies and practices accordingly.

2. Is your paperwork in order?

Having a paper trail of key HR decisions might seem like a dull admin task, but if you don’t put some time into creating and filing the right documents, then you may live to regret it. If you run into any problems, your paperwork could make a huge difference to how you rectify the situation.

3. Have employees had performance discussions?

If you only discuss performance with your employees once a year, then you’re seriously missing out on many opportunities. Encouraging your team to thrive should be part of day-to-day processes, but at the very least, formal conversations should be carried out and recorded once a quarter.  Take a look at our effective performance review documents ready to use for your own business.

4. Have you planned the summer holiday schedule?

The second quarter tends to be the time when employees start to think about booking their summer leave. The weather’s getting warmer, and everyone wants to enjoy a little downtime. Make sure that you update any policies that you might have if necessary and consider operational demands in advance.

5. Have you identified training needs?

Some of your employees may need to brush up on their knowledge and skills to keep moving towards your goals. Work out where the gaps are and create your plan so you know exactly what you’re going to do about it. The options are plentiful, and include formal training, coaching, mentoring, job shadowing, and more.

6. Have your managers been brought up to speed with your priorities?

It’s pointless setting wider strategic goals if you aren’t going to make sure that the right people are on board and know how their work plays a part. The end of the quarter is a good time to bring your management team together for a catch-up and refresh.

7. Have you collected feedback from your employees?

Identifying potential issues before they get out of hand could save you headaches later in the year. An employee survey could be a great option here. Just make sure that you act on your findings!

8. Have you arranged a discussion with your payroll provider?

The end of the quarter coincides with the end of the financial year, so if you outsource your payroll, it makes sense to have a chat with your provider so you can ensure that you’re both on the same page. There may be loose ends that need to be tied up, and it’s always best to action these matters in a timely fashion.

9. Have you commissioned an HR audit?

It can sometimes be hard to take a critical look at your own operations. You might feel inclined to brush tricky issues under the carpet, especially if you’re not quite sure how to tackle them, so why not let HR Revolution carry out an HR audit – it is an ideal way to assess the set up and compliance of your HR function.

After reading through the checklist, you might have realised that you missed the mark at least once or twice when it comes to keeping your people practices in order.  When you are running a business, you’ve got a lot of plates you need to keep spinning; between acquiring new customers and clients, managing the finances, and everything else that needs your attention, HR can sometimes get put on the backburner.

However, HR isn’t just another task to add to your to-do list, it can have a real and very tangible impact on your bottom line and at the most basic level, it can ensure that you don’t face costly damaging legal cases against your business. Embrace it, as its full potential could increase your profits, create a much happier and more productive workforce, and help you to smash through your strategic goals.

So isn’t it time that you started giving your HR practices the dedication that they really deserve? If you know that you need to make the change, but you’re not sure what to do first, then get in touch with HR Revolution, we can help you to establish a plan of action that will get your business to where you want and need it to be.

Get in touch: +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

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Keeping your business compliant

In our opinion when you are an HR consultant, you can often find yourself having in-depth conversations about how business owners can avoid legal action or help with an issue. However, we offer services that go way beyond that add real value to your business, we can help boost your profits, create a happier and more productive workforce and achieve big strategic goals.

Although steering clear of expensive and potentially reputation-damaging legal action is something that many business owners are very keen to do, for obvious reasons, if you’re worried about ending up on the wrong side of employment law, then it’s important that you take some positive steps towards minimising the risk.

Let’s take a look at how HR Revolution could help you keep your business practices compliant, up to date, and above board.

Know the law

As a business owner, it’s your responsibility to keep up to date with the law. New pieces of legislation are passed on a regular basis, so it’s vital that you stay on the ball. The last thing that you want is to find out that new provisions came into force, rendering your existing policies and procedures unlawful.

This might seem like a huge burden, but it doesn’t have to be. HR Revolution will ensure that you get the information that you need well in advance, and are given useful, practical advice so you can implement the necessary changes.

Implement consistent people policies

People policies are there for good reason; they outline acceptable standards of behaviour, make your expectations clear, and map out what will happen if a problem occurs. If you decide though that they should only be applied to some employees some of the time, then you could be accused of discrimination.

The bottom line here is that your whole workforce should be held to the same standards. You’ve no doubt spent a great deal of time creating and implementing your policies. They’re there to help you, so use them properly!

Always keep records

If problems arise, having a comprehensive paper trail can be extremely useful. Your documentation should clearly outline the details of each stage of everyday employment situations, such as absences, performance discussions, grievances and so on.

You can find solutions that will allow you to safely store information of this nature online, or on secure systems. This isn’t always necessary, but it will absolutely save you time in the long run and make sure that your records are up to date, accurate, and confidential.

Give your managers the capability they need

As your business grows, it’s unlikely that you’ll be personally handling all people management practices and if you ensure your managers have the HR training they need, you could avoid finding yourself in a situation whereby your operations aren’t compliant with the law.

It’s down to you to make sure that your managers are consistently compliant. When you invest in your leadership team, you’ll find that many potentially volatile incidents can be quickly defused before they spiral out of control.

Not many business owners would intentionally break the law when it comes to how they treat their greatest asset – their employees, but if you aren’t vigilant, you could find yourself in a tricky situation.

If you’ve decided that it’s time to take control when it comes to complying with employment legislation, then get in touch on +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

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Valentine’s Day; Office do’s and don’ts

It’s Valentines Day… the day where most of us are filled with thoughts of love and romance!?  However it can be a somewhat tedious process for HR… can employers have rules on personal relationships at work? Is it harassment for a worker to ask a colleague out on a date? In today’s business world, dating someone at work is not at all uncommon so here is a list of office do’s and don’ts.

Studies show that after online dating, the workplace is the second biggest place where people meet their significant others. It makes a lot of sense, you are sharing the same space for eight or more hours a day with people who tend to be like-minded and share similar life goals.

Also, the everyday stresses of work life tend to be an easy thing to relate and bond with an individual over. While it can be a great thing, office romances can also cause a lot of undesirable stress and tension. Surely, ending an office relationship can be uncomfortable for both parties, since they  have no choice but to continue to see each other every day, despite the fact that the relationship has dissolved.

DO:

Know Your Company’s Policy

Every company tends to have a bit of a different policy when it comes to dating among colleagues. There isn’t one golden rule, so if you’re thinking about asking someone from work out, it might be best to make sure right away that you know where your company stands on this issue.

There are some businesses that make it a requirement for you to come forth with the relationship and let your higher-ups know about it. Others don’t. Romance is an important part of life, but you shouldn’t allow it to negatively affect your career in any way. So do the research and check out your company’s policy before you set the ball rolling.

Try to Keep it a Secret

Even if the company requires that you tell the bosses about the relationship, you shouldn’t have to tell everyone. One of the best reasons for keeping it a secret is that it can be fun. Having a special relationship with someone while keeping it hidden from plain sight at work can be thrilling and fun for both of you… so long as it doesn’t affect your work!

You will need to avoid public displays of affection at work whatever you decide. Even if you do decide to tell coworkers about the relationship, you should still resist the PDA. The only thing it can lead to is making your other colleagues feel uncomfortable around you.

Take it Seriously

No matter how much you want it to be, an office romance is unlike any other romance. It comes with its own rules, and it’s something that you should take very seriously, not only to help make it a successful relationship, but to avoid issues if the relationship does end up going sour in the end.

The truth of the matter is that a workplace romance has the potential to impact many more people than a regular romance, whether it lasts or ends. And if the relationship does end, try to be as professional about it as possible. It might be incredibly hard to do, but making sure that no negativity enters the workplace as a result is something you need to do. It doesn’t only affect the two of you, it can affect coworkers and clients as well.

DON’T:

Parade it

This has already been mentioned, but it should be reiterated, public displays of affection at work should be absolutely forbidden. No one in the office wants to see that, no matter how relaxed they seem about your relationship. It is something that has no place in the office; this includes not only kissing, but also hugging, hand-holding, and even winking and sending kisses to each other across the office.

These rules should not only apply to work hours, but to all work-related functions, including holiday parties and even trips to the bar with colleagues after work.

It’s also important not to let the relationship affect other relationships you have around the office. If you’ve been going to lunch with the same group of people all year, don’t suddenly abandon them because you all of a sudden only have eyes for your office flame.

Let it Affect Your Work

It’s important not to change the person and employee you are when your partner is present. This could make things really weird in meetings and when working with a group of people in which your partner is included. Be sure not to treat that person any differently than before… remain professional at all times.

If your partner has an idea which you don’t agree with, say something. Don’t let it slide just because of your relationship, things should be the same way they were before you became an item.

Discuss it with Coworkers

Your coworkers are probably going to want to hear the juicy details about your relationship, but you must not give them any. Feeding the office gossip machine is the worst thing that you can possibly do for your relationship and your job.

Discussions of your relationship have no place in the office, no matter how bad you’d like to talk about it. You must remember that you are not the only person affected by what is said.

Conclusion

An office romance can be very rewarding. The workplace is a great place to meet someone who you might be able to connect with romantically on a long-term basis. Just be smart about it and try to keep your romantic life and your business life as separate as possible in these circumstances.

If you need any further advice or guidance give us a call +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

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Why bother with Employment contracts?

Despite it being a legal obligation, many business owners think that it’s in their interests to delay giving an employee a contract, or not bothering at all, but this blog will explain the importance of having employment contracts in place.

Firstly…It’s the Law!!

It is a legal requirement to have an employment contract in place within two months of hiring an employee but if you didn’t know act now – don’t ignore it!

Contracts actually benefit both employers and employees; it helps the employer by setting out clearly what is expected of the employee the hours they should work, how much and how often they are paid, holiday and sick pay arrangements and other day to day issues. It is important for the employee because they then know in addition to items above, how to lodge a grievance, what notice to give and their rights under family friendly policies such as maternity or paternity leave and the company expectations in larger company for more senior employees this is a vital tool for the employer often overlooked. Contracts should be regularly reviewed and updated and if an employee is promoted they should always be issued with an updated contract reflecting their new rights and responsibilities.

Also, given this is a contractual agreement you are putting in place between you and the employee, I would advise that you take professional advise so that you can clearly articulate what you want the contract to say and that you fully understand what you as the employer are committing to.

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It avoids disputes

Even without anything written down, when an employee turns up  for work and gets paid, there is a basic employment contract agreement between the two parties.

Without any written terms then it’s either statutory rights that are in place (which often benefit the employee), or oral agreements which can be open to interpretation and misinterpretation.  Dealing with disputed oral terms is at best time-consuming and at worst can also be financially costly.

Decide the terms that work for your business, by offering a job with terms and conditions that you have set, you are not only presenting a professional image and setting the tone for the employment relationship, but giving clear guidelines to what the employee can expect when working with you.

You can specify working hours, any overtime payments (or not), the notice period you require from them, how much sick pay they can expect, how much holiday they are due, and when they can or cannot take holiday, amongst many other things.

It protects your business

If an employee leaves your employment, you can put restrictions in place (within reason) so that your business is not adversely affected if their next role is in competition with your business. You also need to put in place protection for your business regarding critical, confidential information.

If it’s not specified in the contract, you may be taking a risk if you decide to put someone on gardening leave, or pay them in lieu of notice, if your rights to do this are not detailed in the employment contract.

Finally, to reiterate we would always advise that you take professional guidance so that you can clearly articulate what you want the contract to say and that you fully understand what you as the employer are committing to.  HR Revolution have fully comprehensive contract templates available to download on our website www.hrrevolution.co.uk  and we can also tailor them for you, please do get in touch for further details.

Businesses often wonder if there are contracts in place, do they also need a Company handbook… the answer is yes! A contract is a legally binding document mutually agreed and any variation to it again needs to be mutually agreed and to undergo a period of consultation before any change is implemented. A handbook is a document setting out company policies from expenses to confidentiality, to dealing with harassment and bullying, email, social media and internet policies and many others. It is not legally binding and therefore does not have to be mutually agreed. It gives the employer the ability to change and amend policies to deal with the changes in legislation and social trends eg. Maternity/Paternity etc.

HR Revolution would advise that employers and employees need both.

If you need any further advice on employment contracts or handbooks get in touch, call +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

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How to manage gender reassignment in the workplace – Part 3

In yesterday’s blog we discussed disclosing gender identities, so in this blog we cover how to support your employees and what changes you can make in the workplace.

Managing changeover of an employee’s personal details:

Terminology – You should ask the employee how they wish to be addressed. If the employee is in agreement inform their colleagues and ensure they use the correct terminology.

Documentation – Employer and employee should agree what details need to be changed i.e personal records, access passes etc. A discussion of what will happen to previous records relating to gender should take place to ensure confidentiality is maintained.

Appearance and dress code – A gender neutral dress code could be applied or if not appropriate the employee should be able to follow the dress code in a way which best fits their gender identity.

Toilet, changing and shower facilities –  An employee should never be segregated and told to use particular facilities but be allowed to use those they feel best match their identity following gender reassignment.

Dealing with a sensitive gender identity matter – Issues such as names and/or gender not matching their passport/ID need to be handled sensitively whilst still ensuring the company is compliant in its checks.  Having a third party a business can turn to, to handle these issues can be reassuring for both employer and employee.

Company health insurance scheme – To ensure trans employees are treated fairly, it is recommended for an employer to include treatments and procedures for gender reassignment in its scheme.

Absence from work because of gender reassignment – It is discriminatory to treat an employee, who is absent from work to undergo gender reassignment, less favourably. Depending on an employer’s policy for managing absence, they may wish to record absences due to gender reassignment, but shouldn’t include them in ‘absence triggers’. It may be worth considering if you offer limited special leave (at your discretion) which maybe paid or unpaid

Performance – It is recommended to make allowances for the trans employee’s job performance during transition and a short period afterwards, as surgery is likely to have temporary side effects.  An employee may ask to move to another role or change some duties which may cause difficulties whilst they transition or they may request a phased return to work, wherever possible this should be considered and catered for.

Trans and mental health – A person questioning their gender may experience mental health problems such as anxiety and depression. An employer can support the employee, by providing a welcoming and safe environment at work.

Support an employee with a family member transitioning – It is a type of direct discrimination to treat an employee less favourably than another because of the gender reassignment of someone they are associated with. The impact on an employee with a family member who is transitioning can be considerable; therefore you should treat them with sensitivity and provide them with support such as time off.

Develop trans inclusive policies  – Trans inclusive policies will need to be rolled out. Matters covered should include:

  • Transitioning at work including leave and pay
  • Dress code
  • Toilet, changing and shower facilities
  • Employee’s personal records and how these will be dealt with
  • If possible how an employee can transition to another role/department
  • How an employee should report any gender reassignment discrimination
  • Unacceptable behaviour towards employees inclusive of those of non-binary identities
  • Maternity/paternity/adoption/shared parental leave

These processes are always best supported by HR and it may be advisable to outsource your projects where possible. HR Revolution can carry out any project to ensure the process is performed unbiasedly.

If you need further information or guidance, give HR Revolution a call +44 203 538 5311 or email: info@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

 

How to manage gender reassignment in the workplace – Part 2

In yesterday’s blog we talked about discrimination in the workplace, today we discuss disclosing gender identities.

The job applicant: A ‘transsexual’ person is not required to tell a prospective employer they have changed gender when they apply for a job, it should always be up to them to decide whether to disclose or talk about their gender identity – for fear being misunderstood and/or treated unfairly.

The employee: A person who is starting (or intending) to go through gender reassignment will in practice have no choice but to tell their employer.  The employee will then agree with the employer what information can be shared with whom and when.

Other general rules: Employers and colleagues must not ‘out’ an employee or applicant as trans as they could breach laws. Also, apart from in certain circumstances, it is a criminal offence to reveal, without the person’s permission, that they hold a gender recognition certificate or have applied for one.

If an employee or applicant who is trans decides that some information can be shared, the employer should, without pressuring the employee, talk to them about:

  • What they do and don’t want their colleagues to know
  • Who will be told, who will do the telling, where, when and how, and
  • Whether the employee will be there.

It is advisable that communication of any information to be shared is noted and recorded, and happens before the employee changes their appearance.

Employees disclosing their trans identity to a supportive employer can feel more comfortable at work, with a likely improvement in their morale and productivity, too.

Depending on the employee’s role, it may be beneficial to discuss and agree whether some limited information about their trans identity or gender reassignment should be communicated to clients and customers the employee regularly deals with.

These processes are always best supported by HR and it may be advisable to outsource your projects where possible. HR Revolution can carry out any project to ensure the process is performed unbiasedly.

Look out for Part 3 of the blog tomorrow.

If you need further information or guidance, give HR Revolution a call +44 203 538 5311 or email: info@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

 

How to manage gender reassignment in the workplace – Part 1

The Equality Act 2010 says that you must not be discriminated against because you are transsexual – that is, your gender identity differs from the gender assigned to you at birth.  In the Equality Act it is known as gender reassignment. All transsexual people share the common characteristic of gender reassignment.

Employers, managers and colleagues should be aware that no two gender reassignment situations or two ‘trans’ identities are likely to be exactly the same.  If an employee feels they have been discriminated against, they will be able to bring a claim to an Employment tribunal.

We have put together a three part blog that highlight where you need to be more vigilant when it comes to gender reassignment discrimination in the workplace.

Recruitment

Job advert/job description – These documents can be difficult to write at the best of times; try to ensure they are clear on exactly what is needed for the post.

Advertising – You should consider more than one type of media or advertising platform to avoid ending up with too narrow an audience.

Personal information – Make sure any information you request is relevant to the recruitment process.

Interview – When you meet an applicant, do not assume someone’s gender by their appearance.

References – When contacting a previous employer for a reference always ensure you have the employees consent and be careful to use the correct name and title.

Equality monitoring form – You do not have to track how many job applications you receive from different groups of people, or the characteristics of the people working for you. However, if you do collect personal information (e.g. ethnicity, gender, faith, sexuality) about job applicants or an employee, you must protect their data. You must not discriminate against a candidate based on their personal information.

Pay, terms and conditions of employment

It is important to ensure there are no terms and conditions or contractual benefits that disadvantage or exclude someone based on their gender or gender reassignment.

Promotion

In promotion opportunities, discrimination can be:

  • Turning down applications from anyone because they are proposing to reassign their gender
  • Discourage an employee from applying because they have or are reassigning their gender
  • Not promoting an employee who is the best person for the job based on gender reassignment.

As an employer you have a duty to assess someone’s promotion based on their ability and performance. It is advisable to have a well-structured process for promotions and link these to performance reviews where possible to eliminate the risk of discrimination.

Training

An employer should ensure training opportunities are equally accessible for employees who propose to go through, are going through or have gone through gender reassignment. You should also ensure that you do not withhold training due to those reasons as it could be discriminatory.

Dismissal

It is unlawful for an employer to dismiss an employee because of their gender reassignment, perceived gender reassignment or association with someone else’s gender reassignment.

Redundancy

An employee must not be at a disadvantage or discriminated against in a redundancy process because of their gender reassignment, perceived gender reassignment or association with someone else’s gender reassignment.

When going through redundancy consultations any employees absent because of gender reassignment should still be consulted with.

These processes are always best supported by HR and it may be advisable to outsource your projects including redundancy where possible. HR Revolution can carry out any project to ensure the process is performed unbiasedly.

Look out for Part 2 of the blog tomorrow.

If you need further information or guidance, give HR Revolution a call +44 203 538 5311 or email: info@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

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