How to onboard new employees effectively

Getting the onboarding process right is one of the most important things a company can do, get it wrong and the results can be devastating on the bottom line. If employees don’t have a positive onboarding process it can lead to them leaving their job out of frustration, or feeling that they don’t have a worthwhile place within the company.

So what is Onboarding?

New employee onboarding is the process of getting new recruits adjusted to the social and performance aspects of their new jobs quickly and smoothly. It is the process through which a new hire will learn the attitudes, knowledge, skills and behaviours required to function effectively within a company.

Onboarding isn’t about giving your new employee a computer and showing them to their desk! A truly effective onboarding process needs to be much more than just a morning or a day. It needs to be a continuous process, one which serves to engage, train and develop, giving them the tools for future success.

So why is onboarding so important?

Your employees are your greatest asset as they determine whether or not your business will succeed and grow. Investing in your people is a guaranteed way to capitalize on your investment, so keeping employees informed, engaged, productive and loyal is well worth the effort.Remember developing a highly effective on-boarding process;

  • Engages your new employee from the very beginning, setting a precedent that you value your employees.
  • Gets everyone on the same page in terms of the company’s expectations.
  • Increases employee engagement.
  • Improves employee retention.
  • Integrates new recruits into your corporate culture.
  • Reduces costs by preventing future spending on re-hiring and re-training.
  • Increases work performance and productivity.

The onboarding process

An effective onboarding process;

  • Provides ongoing, clear, concise and consistent channels of communication.
  • Facilitates technical learning throughout the employees first three months.
  • Aligns new employees to key business strategies.
  • Sets milestones to gauge and measure new employee success.
  • Discusses their job description, setting company expectations right from the outset.
  • Presents information in easily-digestible amounts, as if it is not managed properly, the first week in a new job can be information overload.
  • Reinforces the brand and other positive aspects of the company culture.
  • Ensures you cover all the key elements such as health and safety and fire evacuation procedures.

Essentially having a company culture capable of attracting, developing and retaining talented employees!

Download our free guide to successful onboarding here.

Or if you would like any practical help or guidance on anything outlined above, please get in touch: +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

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Why bother with Employment contracts?

Despite it being a legal obligation, many business owners think that it’s in their interests to delay giving an employee a contract, or not bothering at all, but this blog will explain the importance of having employment contracts in place.

Firstly…It’s the Law!!

It is a legal requirement to have an employment contract in place within two months of hiring an employee but if you didn’t know act now – don’t ignore it!

Contracts actually benefit both employers and employees; it helps the employer by setting out clearly what is expected of the employee the hours they should work, how much and how often they are paid, holiday and sick pay arrangements and other day to day issues. It is important for the employee because they then know in addition to items above, how to lodge a grievance, what notice to give and their rights under family friendly policies such as maternity or paternity leave and the company expectations in larger company for more senior employees this is a vital tool for the employer often overlooked. Contracts should be regularly reviewed and updated and if an employee is promoted they should always be issued with an updated contract reflecting their new rights and responsibilities.

Also, given this is a contractual agreement you are putting in place between you and the employee, I would advise that you take professional advise so that you can clearly articulate what you want the contract to say and that you fully understand what you as the employer are committing to.

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It avoids disputes

Even without anything written down, when an employee turns up  for work and gets paid, there is a basic employment contract agreement between the two parties.

Without any written terms then it’s either statutory rights that are in place (which often benefit the employee), or oral agreements which can be open to interpretation and misinterpretation.  Dealing with disputed oral terms is at best time-consuming and at worst can also be financially costly.

Decide the terms that work for your business, by offering a job with terms and conditions that you have set, you are not only presenting a professional image and setting the tone for the employment relationship, but giving clear guidelines to what the employee can expect when working with you.

You can specify working hours, any overtime payments (or not), the notice period you require from them, how much sick pay they can expect, how much holiday they are due, and when they can or cannot take holiday, amongst many other things.

It protects your business

If an employee leaves your employment, you can put restrictions in place (within reason) so that your business is not adversely affected if their next role is in competition with your business. You also need to put in place protection for your business regarding critical, confidential information.

If it’s not specified in the contract, you may be taking a risk if you decide to put someone on gardening leave, or pay them in lieu of notice, if your rights to do this are not detailed in the employment contract.

Finally, to reiterate we would always advise that you take professional guidance so that you can clearly articulate what you want the contract to say and that you fully understand what you as the employer are committing to.  HR Revolution have fully comprehensive contract templates available to download on our website www.hrrevolution.co.uk  and we can also tailor them for you, please do get in touch for further details.

Businesses often wonder if there are contracts in place, do they also need a Company handbook… the answer is yes! A contract is a legally binding document mutually agreed and any variation to it again needs to be mutually agreed and to undergo a period of consultation before any change is implemented. A handbook is a document setting out company policies from expenses to confidentiality, to dealing with harassment and bullying, email, social media and internet policies and many others. It is not legally binding and therefore does not have to be mutually agreed. It gives the employer the ability to change and amend policies to deal with the changes in legislation and social trends eg. Maternity/Paternity etc.

HR Revolution would advise that employers and employees need both.

If you need any further advice on employment contracts or handbooks get in touch, call +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

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4 reasons why small businesses should invest in HR…

When starting up a business, spending money on HR initiatives and policies can easily slip to the bottom of the to-do list. The general focus is to drive immediate returns, and so it can take time to see a real return on investment of HR. As a result, HR is being thrown in the mix with ‘business admin’ and is reduced to a mere box-ticking exercise.

In place of an effective HR strategy, small business owners frequently try to encourage friendly and informal relationships, working under the implied promise of trust and  casual compliance with ‘this is the way that we do things around here’.

Many of the start-ups that began life this way, in a burst of enthusiasm, optimism and sheer hard graft, do not make it past their fifth birthday. Unfortunately, relying on their inherently goal-orientated and collaborative start-up culture to support people management requirements is not an effective plan for growth and longevity.

Small businesses need to strike the balance between managing ground-breaking innovation and challenging the status quo, with ensuring that they have streamlined processes in place that pave the way for long lasting growth. HR is not there to squash these cultural ideals, it’s there to form the foundations on which a successful business can grow and thrive.

So why should small businesses invest their time and money in HR from the beginning and ensure they get a return on their investment? Here are four reasons why small businesses should invest in HR.

1. HR adds value

Small businesses see little, if any, distinction between the strategic and transactional elements of HR. As a result, it is systematically undervalued and under resourced. And yet there is plenty of evidence to show that strategic HR delivers real dividends – especially among disruptive companies that are challenging the status quo. Netflix is a good example of fresh thinking about people management and how centralising and prioritising the employee experience can deliver exceptional results. This innovative culture has been a key factor in the company’s success.

2. Small businesses are leaving themselves vulnerable

With their relaxed attitude to people management, small businesses are leaving themselves exposed to claims that they may struggle to defend in an Employment Tribunal. By investing in HR and developing policies and best practice they will have a fundamental framework to fall back on.

Employee handbooks are essential in today’s workplace as they help set out core Company expectations in terms of general conduct and integral UK policies and employment legislation, take a look at HR Revolution’s employee handbook template designed to cover everything your business requires to remain compliant.

3. It will come back to haunt you if you don’t

The value of HR is often downplayed in the early stages of a business and this can come back bite them, just look at Uber. And they are not alone. There has been no shortage of news stories revealing issues within larger businesses that could have been avoided if even the most basic of HR procedure was in place. Unfortunately, these companies thought about it too late and it rebounded back on them ten fold because by this time they are no longer a small start-up.

4. Managing HR admin is a misuse of individuals’ skillsets

As a small business, you probably don’t have a dedicated HR person – this is typically because at this early stage, survival is the biggest business priority. As a result, the management of HR administration such as approving holidays, managing sickness, and approving expenses, is landing in the laps of busy senior employees by default.

According to recent research, CEOs of small businesses are spending, on average, eight hours a week on all HR-related tasks. That’s more than office or operations managers who spend seven hours a week and might more realistically be expected to spend time on administrative activity. To put that into perspective, the median average cost of CEO time spent on HR equates to £18,700 each year and is an absolute misuse of individuals’ skillsets.

This is where HR Revolution can help you save valuable time and money by automating your all consuming HR tasks…  with breatheHR, an online HR information system starting from as little as £9 per month.

It has been shown that dedicated HR software saves small businesses, on average, four hours a week on HR admin with the use of software that can assist you with your day-to-day tasks.  Take a look at breatheHR below and manage your people, not paper!!

Summary

It’s no longer acceptable for small businesses to allow HR due process to fall by the wayside, prioritising new business over their people management. In the current business economy, where 40% of businesses fail within the first five years, enthusiastic entrepreneurs need to change their tact. Whilst your investments may not bring about immediate returns, your return on investment will be clear when your trained, supported and rewarded employees grow with you.

Call +44 203 538 5311, email: info@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit http://www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

A version of this blog first appeared on breathehr.com

How to nail your 2018 HR planning…

Any business owner knows the importance of using the end of the year as a chance to return to their people policies, consider the achievements and challenges of the past 12 months, and do some careful planning for the future. Keeping on top of your HR can be tricky, but it’s also essential to running a successful business.

However, before getting stuck into finer details, it is wise to take a step back and think about the big issues that need your attention. Here, we’re going to provide you with the inspiration you need to make your planning as effective as possible.

Anticipate any key legislative changes

Not a year goes by without a new piece of legislation coming in that will have an impact on your business. Of course, these are often for the greater good, and will help you to build a stronger workforce. But if you’re not prepared, they can catch you off-guard and cause you significant problems.

Make sure this doesn’t happen by taking the time to anticipate any legislation that will be coming into force, and working out what you need to do to ensure that you’re compliant. In 2018, necessary considerations are likely to include gender pay reporting, taxation of termination payments, General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and restricting employment allowance for hiring illegal workers.

Consider external forces that are out of your control

Often, a lot of thought is given to planning for internal factors, such as sales that you might be running, employee holidays, and so on. You need to make sure though that you’re also thinking about external forces that may have a significant impact on your business.

Are there any big events coming up in your area, and what will they mean for your operations? Are there any other businesses that are likely to be setting up shop, and what are the implications? Could your top talent be tempted to look elsewhere? You can rarely stop these things from happening, but you can make sure that you’re as prepared as possible.

Ask yourself whether you’re really considering strategic goals

We’re past the days of HR being all about tea and sympathy. Savvy business owners know that HR needs a seat at the table and that it can play a significant role in meeting strategic goals. Despite this though, many business owners still aren’t using policies and practices to truly drive their business forward, to say that this is a wasted opportunity would be a huge understatement.

So how are you nurturing your teams so they can fulfill their potential? Are your performance management processes encouraging employees to excel? Is everyone up to date and on-board with the future direction of your business and do they understand the part that they will play? It’s easy to get caught up with all the everyday, operational concerns. And these are of course important. But if you want to move forward, you need to ensure that you’re taking the time to think strategically.

Finding enough hours in the day to plan your 2018 can be a challenge in itself, but it’s non-negotiable though if you’re serious about smashing your goals.

The good news is that you don’t have to do all of this on your own. HR Revolution have many years of experience and can help. Get in touch today for an initial chat about how we may be able to work together, call +44 203 538 5311 or ask us a question below…

 

How to identify stress in the workplace…

What is stress?… the definition provided by the Healthy and Safety Executive (HSE) is “the adverse reaction people have to excessive pressures or other types of demands placed on them”.

As most people are aware stress is not a new problem, but it is something that employers now need to treat very seriously.

For employers the impact of stress is a very real problem.  Not only does it effect an employee’s health, morale, productivity, performance and attendance it can affect business productivity, employee turnover and reputation.

There is also a marked difference between stress and pressure.  In most jobs there is an element of pressure, but this can make employees feel challenged and motivated which can have a positive effect on performance.  Stress however, can cause a detrimental effect to employee’s mental and physical health and well-being.

According the the HSE there are six main causes of stress in the workplace:

  1. Demands – Employees may be unable to cope with the demands of their job, feel overwhelmed with work pattern, workload or environment.
  2. Control – Employees may feel stressed if they feel they are not in control about how they carry out their work, this can lead to them under-performing and feelings of isolation.
  3. Support – Employees can feel stressed if they are not being supported in the workplace by managers or colleagues.
  4. Relationships – If relationships within the workplace are causing stress, this can lead to allegations of bullying, harassment and bad team dynamics, and can lead to employee grievances being raised.
  5. Role – Employees can experience stress if they don’t understand what is expected of them in their role and responsibilities.
  6. Change – Managing change can be very stressful for employees, causing them to worry about how change will effect them.

As an employer it is always good to be vigilant as it is not just the workplace that causes stress.  In many instances personal issues such as relationships, family bereavement, illness and money can have an impact on a employees health.

Spotting signs of stress is key.  You may notice a change in an employee’s behaviour, habit or routine, for example smoking or drinking more, taking more time off or making uncharacteristic mistakes.

If you feel that you have an employee that is suffering with any of the indicators above and don’t know how to handle it, please get int touch with us at HR Revolution +44 203 538 5311 or email: info@hrrevolution.co.uk, we can help you navigate any issues and make sure that your employee feels fully supported.

 

4 reasons why an Employee handbook is a must in any business

Compiling an Employee Handbook might seem like an unneeded task for a small business, and perhaps time consuming, but in reality it is a very useful tool that truly supports your business and its people.

Here at HR Revolution, we want to highlight 4 of the main reasons why we think Employee Handbooks are essential.

  1. An Employee Handbook can help prevent very costly employee disputes

In certain cases employee claims can run into the thousands of pounds and the vast majority of employment law disputes can stem from confusion over what is or not accepted practice within a business.  An Employee Handbook is your opportunity to clearly state your polices and procedures in relation to issues, such as:

  • Holiday and Sickness absence
  • Disciplinary and Grievance
  • Maternity, paternity, adoption and parental leave
  • Anti-harassment and bullying
  • Anti-bribery
  • Health and safety
  • Equality and diversity

Having the above policies in place can help with preventing disputes happening in the first place.

2. An Employee Handbook promotes clear communication and manages expectations in your business

A handbook ensures that every employee knows where to find specific information on policies and procedures that need to be followed, even if they have not been discussed with them.  This gives the employee the knowledge on where they stand and is a major element of ensuring their satisfaction.

It also ensures you have covered all bases when you induct new staff, which is a vital part of your onboarding process, and will promote consistency across your business.

3. An Employee Handbook will set the tone for company culture and outlines acceptable conduct

Your employees need clear and concise information on what is deemed to be acceptable behaviour and conduct and setting the tone for the culture of your company. Leave no room for misinterpretation and set out your best practice on topics such as:

  • Dress code
  • Telecommunications, email, social media and internet
  • Company vehicle and Driving
  • Internal communications
  • Data protection
  • Severe weather and travel disruption
  • Flexible working procedure
  • Time off in Lieu

4. An Employee Handbook underpins your Contracts of Employment

A handbook can be an effective way to complement contracts of employment with company policies and procedures.

You need to be very clear however, which parts of the handbook are contractually binding and which are not.  Also, if you are changing any contractual parts of the handbook you might need to obtain employee consent and make certain that any changes are compliant with Employment Law.

Other considerations to think about when creating your Employee Handbook, is to ensure it can be adapted.  A handbook should be flexible and have the scope to be adapted as the company grows or any new issues or situations arise.  To make sure this flexibility is clear, it is always a good idea to include a note, which reserves the right to make these amendments.  It is also very important that you make sure your employees are fully aware of any changes as and when they happen.

If you are struggling to know where to start, HR Revolution are here to help! call us on +44 203 538 5311 or email: info@hrrevolution.co.uk

HR Revolution – www.hrrevolution.co.uk

5 mistakes employers are making with Employee Handbooks..

A recent survey has stated that over 90% of companies have created an employee handbook to share with their employees; that is positive, but in reality are these handbooks HR compliant?  Just listing policies and sharing some mission statements, will not cut it!!!

So based on the statistics, you’ve probably made a token attempt at creating an employee handbook for your business – but are you missing the mark? Here, we uncover the mistakes that too many businesses are making, and explain how you can turn things around.

Taking a cookie-cutter approach

Of course there are certain things that all employee handbooks should include, but this certainly doesn’t mean that you should just download a free template from Google, fill in the blanks, and hope for the best. Your business is unique. Its culture and practices make it individual, and your handbook needs to reflect this. After all, first impressions count, so you need to make sure that you’re giving your employees a quality document that reflects what you’re really all about.

Don’t be scared to showcase your business’s personality and create something that demonstrates what it’s like to work for your company. Your new employees should feel inspired, motivated, and ready to face their new challenges.

Neglecting to seek out a professional opinion

You wouldn’t finalise your end-of-year accounts without speaking to an accountant, so why should your employment documentation be any different? HR Revolution can advise you on anything that you might have missed, unearth any points that could potentially get you into hot water, and give you the peace of mind that comes with knowing that everything’s in order.

Speaking in legal lingo

Your HR practices need to be created in accordance with relevant legislation. Staying on the right side of the law will save you a whole load of time and hassle. Before stuffing your handbook with jargon though, take a step back and think about how you can make the important information as easy as possible to digest. A better understanding of what’s expected will ultimately lead to higher rates of compliance.

Consider your audience, and keep things as straightforward as possible. At the end of the day, your handbook should be there to help people – not overwhelm them.

 

Letting the document gather dust

The world of business changes and adapts every single day. New legislation is rolled out, light is cast on exciting and innovative ways to get the most out of a workforce, and advances in technology present new challenges. What works right now isn’t necessarily going to be fit for purpose in the near future.

Before signing off your document as completed, set a date for review. Keeping on top of changes can be a manageable job only if you make sure that you don’t let the grass grow under your feet. Shockingly, 2.8% of employers don’t know when they last carried out any reviews or changes – don’t fall into this camp!

Forgetting to make sure that every employee has their copy

Creating a document to be proud of is only the first part of the story. It isn’t going to make any difference unless you ensure that all employees get their copy, and that they’re given time to digest the information. These days, this is easier than ever before. Many companies decide to distribute their handbooks via email or an intranet system.

And finally, be sure to lead by example. When’s the last time that you familiarised yourself with the content? Do you have a copy on your desk? Are you confident that you could answer questions about the points that are covered? If not, consider this your wake-up call!

Ready to seek out some advice that you know you can trust? Whether you’re starting from scratch with your handbook and you’re not sure where to begin, or you’ve done the work yourself and just want a second opinion, HR Revolution can help. Contact us for a no-obligation chat about working together.

HR Revolution’s employee handbooks will help you to set core business policies and expectations and help portray your business culture, values, branding and vision, setting the tone for your business and employees, whilst maintaining HR compliance and best practice for all.

If you would like to discuss any HR issues, please give HR Revolution a call we’d love to help, call us on +44 203 538 5311 or email: info@hrrevolution.co.uk

HR Revolution – www.hrrevolution.co.uk

The heat is on! Are your staff dressing appropriately for this extreme weather?

This week has seen temperatures well exceeding 30 degrees, which to be honest is fairly rare in good old blighty. Non the less, for many workers the heat has been unbearable, in particular in offices and on public transport.

The Workplace Regulations state that an employer must maintain a reasonable temperature but it does not specify a maximum temperature and that can lead to people being in offices that feel more like the heat you would experience on a beach in Dubai than at work, only without the cocktail bar and swimming pool!

So it is really important that at times like this, companies help their employee’s feel as comfortable as possible and part of that it ensuring staff know what they can and can’t wear in the office. In fact it is times like this that a company’s dress code policy should exist!

Before I continue though, I would perhaps use this week as an example of when you may wish to relax the dress code, such as allowing men to do away with the jacket and tie, you can still look smart without them.

I agree that it is perhaps easier for a woman to dress for work in the heat, a short sleeve dress can still look professional, but there are people out there that just don’t know where to draw the line, and you need to ensure that “beach vibe” doesn’t creep into the workplace; unless of course you are happy with hot pants and strings vests all over the place!

The corporate world still often requires very much a “business dress” code to be followed, but if it is not part of your company handbook as a policy, employees don’t really know where they stand.

So if you don’t want people turning up to work in crop tops, hot pants and flip flops then be sure to put it in writing. Here are some key points to remember when putting together your dress code policy:

  • Avoid unlawful discrimination in any dress code policy.
  • Employers may have health and safety reasons for having certain standards.
  • Dress codes must apply to both men and women equally, although they may have different requirements.
  • Reasonable adjustments must be made for disabled people when dress codes are in place.

Your dress code policy should always be reasonable and relate to the job, for example employees may be required to tie their hair back or wear a head cover for hygiene reasons if working in a kitchen.

As we have mentioned, the policy must be non-discriminatory and apply to both men and women, however, the requirements may be different i.e. you might state “business dress” for women but more specifically state “must wear a tie” for men, again it would be worth relaxing this on days where temperatures hit the high twenties (just be specific!).

It is always good to remember the reasoning behind your decisions in regards to the dress code policy you put in place, after all, if an employee does not comply with the standards contained within it, it may result in disciplinary action.

If you are still unsure whether you have the correct policy, then get in touch, we’re here to help, but in the meantime we hope you are keeping cool and helping your employees to do so too!

HR Revolution – www.hrrevolution.co.uk

Your new improved bespoke HR Outsourcing website has landed

At HR Revolution we have streamlined our website, so all our great HR solutions are in one place. So whether you’re looking to outsource your HR support or download a contract of employment, it’s all just one click away.

With more small businesses outsourcing their HR function, you need to know you are making the right choice.  As your outsourced HR Partner we work alongside you to tailor a bespoke HR solution, ensuring your employees are properly contracted, fully committed, highly engaged and your business thoroughly protected.

HR Revolution are real people, providing real solutions for businesses with real drive. Performance focused HR that builds your business with you.

Take a look and see how we can help you revolutionise the way in which you use HR…

Flexible HR solutions to suit any business… come and have a browse…

Contact HR Revolution for practical HR support and advice +203 538 5311 or email: customerservices@hrrevolution.co.uk

HR Revolution – www.hrrevolution.co.uk

 

How will the political parties manifestos effect employment and HR?

Today, Thursday 8th June is the General Election 2017, where the people of the UK will head to the polls and elect a new government.

So what is each political party pledging around employment, talent and pensions? and which of the major parties’ policies will affect HR?

All the main parties have focused on employment matters and worker rights as fertile ground for winning votes – perhaps more than ever before.

Here’s our detailed round-up of who’s pledging what:

The Conservative party will:

  • Introduce a national retraining scheme. Under it the costs of training will be met by the government, with companies able to use the apprenticeship levy to support wage costs during the training period
  • Continue the campaign for fairer corporate governance. The party has stated that there will be new rules for takeovers and executive pay, with proposals around annual shareholder votes on pay packages and a requirement to publish pay ratios
  • Reduce the ‘triple lock’ on pensions to a ‘double lock’, with the state pension to rise by the higher of average earnings or inflation
  • Not increase VAT, but scrap a 2015 election pledge not to raise income tax or National Insurance
  • Make universities that are charging maximum tuition fees sponsor academies or help found free schools
  • Retain all workers’ rights currently guaranteed by EU law
  • Put worker representation on listed company boards
  • Introduce a statutory right to a year’s unpaid leave to care for a relative, and statutory leave for parents whose child has died.

The Labour party will:

  • Ban zero-hours contracts and unpaid internships
  • Raise the minimum wage to £10 by 2020 and scrap the public sector pay cap
  • Abolish university tuition fees
  • Offer an immediate guarantee about the status of EU nationals in the UK
  • Stop all planned increases to the state pension age after 66
  • Give all workers equal rights from day one, whether they’re part time or full time, temporary or permanent
  • Repeal the Trade Union Act and roll out sectoral collective bargaining
  • Guarantee trade unions a right to access workplaces
  • Abolish employment tribunal fees
  • Double paid paternity leave to four weeks and increase paternity pay
  • Strengthen protections against unfair redundancy for women
  • Create a million “good jobs” and rebalance the regions through setting up a National Investment Bank (which will leverage enough private finance to invest £250 billion in infrastructure over 10 years), a network of regional development banks, and a national transformation fund
  • Add four new public holidays per year.

The Liberal Democrats will:

  • Initiate a second EU referendum, with an option to remain in the EU
  • Expand Shared Parental Leave with an additional ‘use it or lose it’ month to encourage fathers to take time off with young children
  • Unilaterally guarantee the rights of EU nationals in the UK
  • Strengthen worker participation in decision-making, including staff representation on remuneration committees and the right for employees of a listed company to be represented on the board
  • Introduce a ‘good employer’ kitemark covering areas such as paying a living wage, avoiding unpaid internships, and using name-blind recruitment
  • Introduce a right for those on zero-hours contracts to request a fixed contract. The party would also consult on rights to request more regular working patterns
  • Aim to double the number of businesses hiring apprentices.

The Green Party will:

  • Phase in a four-day working week with a maximum of 35 hours
  • Scrap age-related wage bands and raise the national minimum wage to living wage levels for all
  • Take steps towards the introduction of a universal basic income
  • Introduce a ban on exploitative zero-hours contracts
  • Reduce the gap between the highest and lowest paid
  • Ensure a minimum 40% of all members of public company and public sector boards are women
  • Abolish the cap on National Insurance contributions so the wealthiest pay more
  • Provide free early education and childcare for all children, with formal education starting at age seven
  • Initiate a referendum on the detail of whatever deal is negotiated for Britain’s departure from the EU, with the option to reject the deal and remain in the EU
  • Immediately guarantee the rights of EU citizens to remain in the UK and urgently seek reciprocal arrangements for UK citizens living in the EU.

UKIP will:

  • Declare 23 June Independence Day, and make it a bank holiday
  • Introduce a flexible state pension window, so people can opt to retire earlier for a lower state pension or work longer for a slightly higher pension, as is the case at the moment
  • Bring forward legislation requiring employers to advertise jobs to British citizens before they offer them overseas.

The SNP will:

  • Devolve to allow Scotland to have its own policies after Brexit
  • Guarantee a living wage to all adults aged 18 and over
  • Lobby for the scrapping of the Skills Immigration Charge – a charge for employers of £1,000 per non-EEA worker per year
  • Call for the full reinstatement of the Post-Study Work Visa scheme, which allows foreign students to stay in the UK after graduation
  • Increase free childcare to 30 hours a week by 2020
  • Ensure companies engaging in blacklisting or ‘exploitative’ zero-hours contracts are barred from publicly-procured contracts
  • Incentivise oil and gas businesses to invest in renewables to protect jobs in the energy sector.

HR Revolution – www.hrrevolution.co.uk

A version of this article first appeared in HR Magazine