Office parties – a word of ‘festive’ warning!

For HR departments and employment lawyers alike, it is as much a Christmas tradition as turkey and mince pies. Every December we bring out articles on the perils of holding an office Christmas party, so as not to disappoint here are this year’s top tips.
Venue
It’s worth thinking carefully about the venue for your Christmas party. Is it accessible to all? including those with a disability? Can people get home easily? Choosing a venue that might encourage people to ‘drink and drive’ is clearly not advisable. So consider whether you have good public transport links or ready access to taxis.
Invitation list
When compiling the invitations be as inclusive as possible, no one should feel left out. Remember to make an effort to invite those who are currently away from work, whether because of maternity leave, sickness or any other reason. If employees are encouraged to invite their partners along, allow for the reality of unmarried couples and same-sex relationships.
Party planning
Think how you can make the party appealing to all. Organising an event based solely around the consumption of large quantities of alcohol will no doubt please some of your employees, but it could well be a turn-off for others. In particular, be sensitive to the religious and other beliefs of your employees; make sure there are plenty of non-alcoholic drink options and any food on the menu contains a vegetarian option.

Also be mindful of any guest speakers or entertainers you choose to use. There is a very well-known Employment Tribunal case circa 1996 that arose out of the booking of the ‘stand-up comedian’ Bernard Manning. You can probably guess what went wrong there!

Discussion topics
When a lot of alcohol has been consumed, people become less inhibited and more likely to say (or do) precisely what is on their mind. As a result, the risk of discrimination and harassment claims rears its ugly head. So make sure people understand that this is a work event and a level of professionalism is still required. Oh, and if you’re the boss, remember that alcohol and conversions about pay rises don’t mix!
The morning after
Make sure people understand whether they are required to be in work the day after the Christmas party. If they phone in sick, carefully consider whether it is genuine sickness or the result of over-indulgence. Then consider whether disciplinary action is required.
Policy revision?
You don’t need a policy specifically to cover your Christmas party, but it is worth considering whether your existing policies on conduct, harassment etc. are clear about what is expected of employees in this context. Take a look at HR Revolution’s Employee Handbook, it helps set out core Company expectations in terms of general conduct and includes all of your integral UK policies and employment legislation.
Lastly; enjoy, let your hair down and have fun!
Finally, and before we begin to sound too much like the equivalent of ‘Scrooge’, the Christmas party is a chance to come together, celebrate a successful year and thank your colleagues/employees for their efforts. It is also an opportunity to have fun. So having taken some sensible precautions, relax, unwind and enjoy yourself. You deserve it!
If you need any help or advice with any issues discussed above or updating any office policies all found in our comprehensive Employee handbook, why not get in touch HR Revolution and make sure your office Christmas passes without incident.

Give us a call +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

 

New National Minimum Rates announced

Effective from April 2018, the Chancellor Philip Hammond confirmed in his Autumn budget, national minimum wage increases and a new scheme affecting care sector employers who may have underpaid their employees.

New National Minimum Wage Rates

In line with the intention for the national minimum wage to increase to £9 per hour from 2020, it will increase from £7.50 to £7.83, representing a 4.4 percent uplift.  In practical terms, this will mean a pay rise of around £600 per year for a full time worker.

The other rates will increase as follows:

  • Workers aged 21-24 from £7.05 to £7.38 per hour
  • Workers aged 18-20 from £5.60 to £5.90 per hour
  • Workers aged 16-17 from £4.05 to £4.20 per hour
  • Apprentice rate from £3.50 to £3.70 per hour

The Budget was also used to announce a review of the flexibility in the way organisations may use their apprenticeship levy (large companies have been required to pay this levy since April 2017 which they can then use to fund apprenticeships) and a National Retraining Scheme to support worker’s career development.

Care employers advised to correct minimum wage wage under payments

A new scheme to encourage companies in the care sector to make good any minimum wage underpayments was launched on 1st November 2017.

Recent employment tribunal judgements have shifted a focus onto a companies minimum wage obligations in the specific area of sleep-in shifts.  HMRC’s interpretation of the legislation, in common circumstances, requires that all hours of a sleep-in shift attract the minimum wage, regardless of whether the worker is asleep.

In order to soften the impact of these decisions on social care companies, the Social Care Compliance Scheme (SCCS) will see any underpayments corrected but remove the enforcement measures applied to companies that are found to have underpaid their workers. Employers have until the end of 2018 to join up to the scheme.

Committees publish draft bill on gig economy workers

A joint draft bill containing enhanced proctections for gig economy workers has been published by two government committees.

The propsal focuses on giving individuals more certainty about their status by providing an automatic assumption of “worker” status, meaning that it would be for the company to prove otherwise at employment tribunal.  This would also mean that these workers would be entitled to certain employment rights from day one.

Some recommendations from the Taylor Report are also included in the Bill, such as considerations of a higher national minimum wage rate for those on zero hour contracts. The government is yet to provide its full response to the review and this Bill will add more pressure on the government to take action.

If you need any help or guidance on the above, get in touch with HR Revolution.

Give us a call +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

A version of this article first appeared on CIPD HR-inform.

Plan ahead for the January productivity slump

So December is only a couple of weeks away and around this time of year spirits are generally high with everyone looking forward to the opportunity to take a little time out with friends and loved ones.

However, by the New Year the general mood and feel has often shifted slightly. With nothing but rainy dark days and credit card bills to look forward to, productivity in the workplace can come to a grinding halt. Here are our best tips for overcoming the January slump!

Give thanks…

It’s likely that your employees may have worked longer shifts over the Christmas period. They’ll have dealt with stressful situations and difficult discussions, and it’s understandable if they’re feeling a bit burnt out. Some might even be asking themselves what the point in all of it even was.

Saying thank you is so simple and it’s something that you should be doing regularly, but it’s all too easy to overlook the basics in favour of developing complex strategies. Make sure your employees know that their contribution didn’t go unnoticed.

Set new goals…

January can be a time when everyone settles back into their usual routines. The pressure might be lifted slightly, and whilst this can be a positive thing, it can also sometimes encourage complacency. Instead of letting this happen, make sure that you have a plan of action to guide you through the first quarter.

Call a team meeting, invite feedback and opinions, and ensure that everyone is fully up to speed and engaged with new priorities. This will act as a timely reminder that it’s time to get back to business!

Get ahead in 2018…

You might be the boss, but that that doesn’t mean that you’re immune to the January blues! You should ensure that you celebrate your successes and take time to reflect on your achievements over the past 12 months, but it’s important that you also look at ways in which you can improve your skills and start the New Year with a bang.

Ask your employees to give you an open and honest assessment of how you’ve performed as a leader, and what you can do to support them better in the future. The best business owners are always considering how they can step up and lead by example.

If you need any help, why not let HR Revolution give you the HR solutions you need to get 2018 off to a flying start…

Give us a call +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

 

Landmark employment law cases: Uber/Deliveroo – The decision on drivers and riders rights; what could this mean for your business?

This has been a very hot topic recently and we have been overloaded with articles about what the “workers” versus “self-employed” issues/rights means, so now the ruling has been made HR Revolution discuss what this means for businesses going forward.

The Employment Appeals Tribunal ruled on Friday that Uber’s drivers qualify as workers, giving drivers rights such as the minimum wage and holiday pay, resulting in potentially damaging the way the company operates.  Currently the average hourly rate minus fees, petrol and expenses may mean an Uber driver is not earning the minimum wage.

Although Uber argued that their drivers have the freedom to choose when and where they work, the EAT ruled that drivers were effectively working for Uber while the app was switched on, and were not able to make themselves available to other operators as Uber had claimed.  In addition, the way Uber limits driver contact with customers, the language it uses when recruiting drivers and the way it treats those drivers who refuse a fare, resulted in the EAT concluding that Uber exerts control over the drivers, meaning they are to be deemed as workers as opposed to being self-employed and are therefore entitled to worker rights.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2017/11/10/uber-loses-key-appeal-drivers-rights/

Conversely in the case brought by the Independent Workers Union of Great Britain, Deliveroo riders have been ruled “self-employed” by the labour law body the Central Arbitration Committee (CAC).  This further highlights the complexity of determining the employment status and why it is imperative care is taken when considering whether the individual has worker rights including holiday pay and minimum wage.

The key to this case was that in the contract between Deliveroo and the riders; riders had the freedom to substitute the services to a “mate” both before and after they had accepted a particular job if they wished – allowing other riders to take their place on a job. The CAC found that the right to substitution was genuine in day to day practice and therefore found the riders be self-employed. To further support Deliveroo’s case, the new terms also stated that riders did not have to wear branded clothing.

Both of these decisions have been based on whether there is “control” from the employer to the employee and in the case of Deliveroo the lack of control meant the balance was tipped as the riders having self-employed status.

Riders enjoy being their own boss – having the freedom to choose when and where they work, and riding with other delivery companies at the same time.  In practical terms, this implies they are genuinely self-employed.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-41983343

What could these rulings mean for your business?

Both of these rulings although contradictory, have significant implications for the gig economy in particular.  It also clearly demonstrates that there is still a lot of ambiguity and confusion around employment status, which is expected to be given clarity by the government by the end of the year.

The outcomes of both these cases emphasises the importance of ensuring you are giving those entitled to employment rights, just that and also ensuring any contractors are complying with any IR35 rules.  It means care and consideration should be exercised by both the employer and employee when entering into an independent contractor agreement on a self-employed basis.

Any business should take guidance from both of these cases as they demonstrate how important it is that your employee status is. Make sure the use of self-employed contractors are being used correctly within your business and not just as a label to get around the rules.  With the number of self-employed contractors increasing significantly, both of these rulings are likely to be significant for employment law in the UK.

The lesson from both of these cases lies around the control identified in the terms and conditions of an independent contractor agreement.  Although this doesn’t set a new precedent as all cases will be judged on their own merits, the control you exert over anyone self-employed within your business should be carefully considered to avoid any similar claims.

Deciding on the appropriate employment status can be difficult for many companies. If you have concerns regarding this, HR Revolution are here to help, get in touch with one of our consultants who can offer you a free consultation to ensure that you are compliant.

Give HR Revolution a call +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

 

 

Thinking about HR for your business?

A recent study from Recruiter Robert Walters, which surveyed 123 hiring managers, found that 89% intended to hire mid-level HR staff, while 77% planned to recruit at junior level.  43% of employers explained that growth in their businesses was driving their hiring strategies.   However, according to Laura Harrison, Strategy and Transformation Director at the CIPD, the changing economic and political environment also meant that businesses were increasingly turning to HR for expertise and advice.

She also went onto say “Businesses are trying to plan for Brexit and the potential skills shortage that will come with it, so there is a lot of change management to do.  All involves HR, so it’s not surprising that more HR professionals are being recruited.  HR is a guiding light because there is only so much that line managers can dedicate their time to.”  Harrison added that the “unprecedented levels of change and uncertainty” many organisations were facing required “fair, consistent and coherent HR.”

If you have concerns about the future but currently don’t have the budget to employ a full-time HR professional, why not explore the outsourced solutions that HR Revolution can bring to your business.

We are an outsourced HR company and simply put, want to revolutionise the way in which businesses work with HR.  Wendy Read our CEO explains “We know that people are the key to any successful business, without them the wheels just do not turn.  The problem is that most businesses don’t focus on their people and only concentrate on the bottom line.  Our philosophy is simple; focus on your people, hire, on-board, train, manage and develop them and the bottom line will look after itself.”

Why not give us a call today and see how HR Revolution can help your business +44 203 538 5311 or email: info@hrrevolution.co.uk

HR Revolution – www.hrrevolution.co.uk

Why you need HR…

Lets face it, in an ideal world, we’d never have to worry about firefighting people issues within a business. We’d have perfectly crafted policies, highly skilled line managers and engaged employees who are passionate about helping business operations reach their full potential.

I did say in an ideal world, however, things have a tendency not to work out that way. Pretty much every business owner would have experienced some tricky HR issues during their career, and most would probably agree that they can sometimes come out of the blue.

Let us help you identify any potential people issues in your business, until the end of August we are conducting obligation free Audit’s worth £750 free of charge, email info@hrrevolution.co.uk and enter FREEAUDIT in the subject line to book.

In the meantime, if you’ve found yourself with a complex and confusing people issue that you’ve had to deal with, you need to be focused on finding the solution.

Here, we explain in 3 steps how you can take control.

  1. Use the law as your first port of call

Employment legislation exists for a reason. It’s there to protect workers and ensure that standards are upheld. It can be confusing to navigate at times, but it’s imperative to recognise that ultimately, it can help you. If you’re handling an HR problem and you’re not sure what to do, the first thing that you should consider is your legal responsibilities.

An example, an employee came and told you that they feel that they need a pay rise. As long as you’re paying your employees the minimum wage, you aren’t obliged to reconsider your benefits package.  Obviously, this doesn’t mean that you should just brush the comments under the table. Exemplary employers move past compliance, and consider the bigger picture and the future of their business.

  1. Bring in the specialists

Sometimes, knowing the law isn’t enough to cut it. If you’re dealing with a particularly sensitive or complex issue, you might need a little extra help. It’s vital that HR concerns are dealt with in a timely manner, and that you get it right first time, so working with an experienced professional could give you that extra peace of mind that you really need.

HR Revolution deal with people issues every day, so we have the knowledge and expertise to cut straight to the heart of any situation to deliver the very best solution.

  1. Stop repeating the same mistakes

You’ve handled your HR issue, and come out the other side breathing a sigh of relief.   Back to business as usual… actually it’s a great time to take a step back and assess your current position and opportunities.

What lessons have you learned?  How can you prevent the same thing from happening again?

In many cases, if you decide to work with an HR consultant, you will be left with a detailed action plan so you can raise your game and become a better employer.

Ultimately though, never forget it comes down to you. Are you serious about nurturing your employees in the best way possible?  Issues are sometimes inevitable, and come hand in hand with running a business. What really matters is the ability to handle the situation in a way which best serves your employees and your business.

Get in touch with HR Revolution and let us conduct an obilgation free HR Audit, where will carry out a full review your current HR, including HR documentation, employee files and processes. We will provide a detailed report to summarise the areas that need attention, especially anything critical required to keep your business compliant with the most up to date employment laws and practices.

Please give HR Revolution a call on +44 203 538 5311 or email: info@hrrevolution.co.uk

HR Revolution – www.hrrevolution.co.uk

 

How will the political parties manifestos effect employment and HR?

Today, Thursday 8th June is the General Election 2017, where the people of the UK will head to the polls and elect a new government.

So what is each political party pledging around employment, talent and pensions? and which of the major parties’ policies will affect HR?

All the main parties have focused on employment matters and worker rights as fertile ground for winning votes – perhaps more than ever before.

Here’s our detailed round-up of who’s pledging what:

The Conservative party will:

  • Introduce a national retraining scheme. Under it the costs of training will be met by the government, with companies able to use the apprenticeship levy to support wage costs during the training period
  • Continue the campaign for fairer corporate governance. The party has stated that there will be new rules for takeovers and executive pay, with proposals around annual shareholder votes on pay packages and a requirement to publish pay ratios
  • Reduce the ‘triple lock’ on pensions to a ‘double lock’, with the state pension to rise by the higher of average earnings or inflation
  • Not increase VAT, but scrap a 2015 election pledge not to raise income tax or National Insurance
  • Make universities that are charging maximum tuition fees sponsor academies or help found free schools
  • Retain all workers’ rights currently guaranteed by EU law
  • Put worker representation on listed company boards
  • Introduce a statutory right to a year’s unpaid leave to care for a relative, and statutory leave for parents whose child has died.

The Labour party will:

  • Ban zero-hours contracts and unpaid internships
  • Raise the minimum wage to £10 by 2020 and scrap the public sector pay cap
  • Abolish university tuition fees
  • Offer an immediate guarantee about the status of EU nationals in the UK
  • Stop all planned increases to the state pension age after 66
  • Give all workers equal rights from day one, whether they’re part time or full time, temporary or permanent
  • Repeal the Trade Union Act and roll out sectoral collective bargaining
  • Guarantee trade unions a right to access workplaces
  • Abolish employment tribunal fees
  • Double paid paternity leave to four weeks and increase paternity pay
  • Strengthen protections against unfair redundancy for women
  • Create a million “good jobs” and rebalance the regions through setting up a National Investment Bank (which will leverage enough private finance to invest £250 billion in infrastructure over 10 years), a network of regional development banks, and a national transformation fund
  • Add four new public holidays per year.

The Liberal Democrats will:

  • Initiate a second EU referendum, with an option to remain in the EU
  • Expand Shared Parental Leave with an additional ‘use it or lose it’ month to encourage fathers to take time off with young children
  • Unilaterally guarantee the rights of EU nationals in the UK
  • Strengthen worker participation in decision-making, including staff representation on remuneration committees and the right for employees of a listed company to be represented on the board
  • Introduce a ‘good employer’ kitemark covering areas such as paying a living wage, avoiding unpaid internships, and using name-blind recruitment
  • Introduce a right for those on zero-hours contracts to request a fixed contract. The party would also consult on rights to request more regular working patterns
  • Aim to double the number of businesses hiring apprentices.

The Green Party will:

  • Phase in a four-day working week with a maximum of 35 hours
  • Scrap age-related wage bands and raise the national minimum wage to living wage levels for all
  • Take steps towards the introduction of a universal basic income
  • Introduce a ban on exploitative zero-hours contracts
  • Reduce the gap between the highest and lowest paid
  • Ensure a minimum 40% of all members of public company and public sector boards are women
  • Abolish the cap on National Insurance contributions so the wealthiest pay more
  • Provide free early education and childcare for all children, with formal education starting at age seven
  • Initiate a referendum on the detail of whatever deal is negotiated for Britain’s departure from the EU, with the option to reject the deal and remain in the EU
  • Immediately guarantee the rights of EU citizens to remain in the UK and urgently seek reciprocal arrangements for UK citizens living in the EU.

UKIP will:

  • Declare 23 June Independence Day, and make it a bank holiday
  • Introduce a flexible state pension window, so people can opt to retire earlier for a lower state pension or work longer for a slightly higher pension, as is the case at the moment
  • Bring forward legislation requiring employers to advertise jobs to British citizens before they offer them overseas.

The SNP will:

  • Devolve to allow Scotland to have its own policies after Brexit
  • Guarantee a living wage to all adults aged 18 and over
  • Lobby for the scrapping of the Skills Immigration Charge – a charge for employers of £1,000 per non-EEA worker per year
  • Call for the full reinstatement of the Post-Study Work Visa scheme, which allows foreign students to stay in the UK after graduation
  • Increase free childcare to 30 hours a week by 2020
  • Ensure companies engaging in blacklisting or ‘exploitative’ zero-hours contracts are barred from publicly-procured contracts
  • Incentivise oil and gas businesses to invest in renewables to protect jobs in the energy sector.

HR Revolution – www.hrrevolution.co.uk

A version of this article first appeared in HR Magazine

Key Employment law changes to look out for in April 2017

April is a busy time for HR Revolution and business owners alike. Not only are we required to tie up any loose ends from the previous financial year… We also need to make sure that we’re fully prepared for legislative changes that could impact on our and our client’s businesses.

This is a time when new rules come into force, so there’s no space right now for burying your head in the sand. You need to be prepared, and you need to take action.

Here’s what you need to know:

National wage is set to increase

On 1st April, the national minimum wage will increase from £6.95 to £7.05  For workers aged 25 and over, the national living wage rate will increase from £7.20 to £7.50.

As the rate varies according to age group, now is a great time to make sure that you’re compliant, and that payroll processes are in order.

Statutory redundancy pay will rise

New rules around redundancy pay will be rolled out from 6th April. If you have to make employees redundant, then you must pay those with two years’ service a sum based on their length of service, weekly pay, and age.

The weekly pay is subject to a maximum amount, and this will rise from £479 to £489.

Statutory maternity pay will rise

Statutory rates for maternity pay, paternity pay, shared parental pay, adoption pay will rise from £139.58 to £140.98 on 2nd April.

Statutory sick pay will rise

The rate of statutory sick pay is also increasing from £88.45 to £89.35. This increase is expected to occur on 6 April 2017.

To be entitled to these statutory payments, the employee’s average earnings must be equal to or more than the lower earnings limit.

The lower earnings limit is increasing from £112 to £113 in April 2017.  This is the first rise since the rates were frozen in April 2015.

Gender pay gap reporting comes into force

If you employ 250 or more employees, then this applies to you. You will be required to report on your gender pay gap, including any bonuses that you might use to reward your staff.

You’ll have a period of 12 months to publish this information on your own website, and upload the details to a government website. As such, you need to make sure that you have mechanisms in place to collect the necessary facts and figures.

Immigration skills charge will be introduced

Do you sponsor skilled workers under tier 2 of the immigration points-based system? If so, you will be required to pay a sponsorship levy of £1,000 per year for each certificate of sponsorship – or £364 if you’re a smaller business or charity.

There are certain exemptions that apply, so if your business hires skilled immigrants, it pays to seek out tailored advice.

Depending on the size of your business and other factors that may be at play, there are further changes that you need to be aware of. April is a fantastic time to carry out an audit of your policies and procedures, to make sure that you’re fulfilling your legal responsibilities.

With that in mind, pick up the phone and get in touch +44 203 538 5311 or email: info@hrrevolution.co.uk. We can arrange to have a discussion around the changes that you may need to implement in coming weeks, so you can move into the new financial year with the peace of mind that comes with knowing that everything is under control.

HR Revolution – www.hrrevolution.co.uk

 

 

Employers’ bizarre excuses for failing to pay minimum wage

I find this unbelievable in 2017!  Please make sure you are not an employer to be accused of this and keep on top of Employment law in your workplace.

One boss failed to pay the minimum wage to a worker because “she only makes the teas” and that is just one of a string of bizarre excuses by employers.

Another argued their case for not paying the legal minimum, saying that a member of staff “wasn’t a good worker”, while one said employees should “prove their worth”.

These excuses, heard by HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC), were published as part of a government awareness campaign.

It is encouraging people to check their wages and warning employers of fines.

Business Minister Margot James said: “There are no excuses for underpaying staff what they are legally entitled to”.

“This campaign will raise awareness among the lowest paid in society about what they must legally receive and I would encourage anyone who thinks they may be paid less to contact Acas as soon as possible.”

All workers must be paid at least £7.20 an hour if they are aged 25 and over, in order to comply with the National Living Wage.

The National Minimum Wage means that:

  • Workers aged 21 to 24 should receive a legal minimum of £6.95 an hour
  • Staff aged 18 to 20 should get at least £5.55 an hour
  • Pay should be at least £4 an hour for the under-18s
  • Apprentices should receive a minimum of £3.40 an hour

Among the cases investigated by HMRC was a boss who thought it was acceptable to pay foreign staff below the statutory rate.

I also heard from one employer who said: “She doesn’t deserve the national minimum wage because she only makes the teas and sweeps the floors.”

Another said: “My accountant and I speak a different language – he doesn’t understand me and that’s why he doesn’t pay my workers the correct wages.”

Len McCluskey, general secretary of the Unite union, said: “Too often, companies are skimming their profits out of the pockets of their workforce. It is a continuing reminder that, for too many working people, work in this country just does not pay.

“While it is good to see the rogues being held to account in some way, the fines can only ever be a rap on the knuckles.”

Stewart Gee, of the conciliation service Acas, said: “We welcome this new government awareness campaign, as there are no good excuses for not paying staff what they are legally entitled to.

“Employers are breaking the law if they do not pay the national minimum wage and businesses face a maximum fine of £20,000 per worker for not paying the national living wage. Failure to pay the national living wage could also result in a company director being banned for up to 15 years.”

If this article has highlighted any issues, please do get in touch HR Revolution would love to help, call us now +44 203 538 5311 or email@ info@hrrevolution.co.uk

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A version of this article first appeared on http://www.bbc.co.uk

Key Employment Law changes to look out for in 2017

The saying is so true, there are few things in life you can guarantee but death, taxes and employment law changes are among them!!  So we’ve outlined 3 changes that will be coming this year, so make sure you get 2017 off to a flying start by being prepared.

Remember you need to be compliant and there are absolutely no excuses when it comes to employment law, let HR Revolution advise you.

Let’s take a look at the changes you need to pencil in your diary…

Gender pay gap reporting

For the first time, private sector, public sector, and voluntary sector employers with 250+ members of staff will be required to publish information relating to the gender pay gap, and how they are performing in terms of driving forward equality.

At the moment, the exact requirements are still being drafted, though it’s expected that the deadline for the first report will be 4th April 2018, based on data from 2016/2017. We’ll release more guidance on this once it’s available.

Changes to regulations surrounding employment of foreign workers

From April 2017, employers sponsoring foreign workers with a tier 2 visa will have to pay an immigration skills charge of £1,000 per worker. This will be reduced to £364 for small employers and charities.

In addition to this, the minimum annual salary threshold for ‘experienced workers’ applying for a tier 2 visa will be increased to £30,000. If you employ foreign workers, or plan to open up your recruitment channels in the near future? You need to make sure you’re compliant.

National minimum wage and living wage changes to be aligned

The dates for changes to national minimum wage and national minimum wage will be brought into alignment, so the good news here is that there are less dates to keep track of!

From April 2017, the national living wage for staff aged 25 or over will increase to £7.50 per hour.

All things considered, there’s plenty to think about in 2017, and plenty that you need to plan for. And of course, there’s the tricky issue of Brexit…

There’s still a grey area over what we should really expect, though things are likely to become clearer in the coming months. Make sure that you keep an eye on our updates for practical, no-nonsense guidance on what you really need to know.

Do you need help ensuring compliance? Give HR Revolution a call today: +44 203 538 5311 we’d love to help.

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HR Revolution HR Documents

Visit HR Revolution’s document shop, for all your HR document needs