FRIDAY HR FAQS – Why is speed important in the recruitment process?

Stand-out talent with forward-thinking mindsets are in high demand, which means businesses need to be reactive to the market and move quickly to secure the best people for their teams.

The recruitment process works at its best when it is quick and there are no delays from the employer’s side, which could risk a good candidate being snapped up by a competitor.  This is particularly true for the junior and middle management market, where strong candidates can take their pick of jobs.

On top of this technological advancement means the hiring process has sped up and candidates are being matched to potential employers by AI powered tools.

To remain competitive and in with a chance of welcoming engaging minds to your team, here are some considerations you need to think about before beginning a recruitment project:

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Be quick to respond

If you want to have great talent in your team, then you need to prioritise hiring.

Recruiters might seem like they are nagging you to respond, but the reason for this is because they know what a great candidate looks like and that they will be on the radar of your competitors – so they are acting quickly to secure them.

If you’re too busy too manage the admin of a hiring project, then consider using an HR consultancy who can manage the process for you.

Know who you’re after

It pays to have a plan in place before you start looking for someone new to bring on board – even if they’re a replacement – taking the time to evaluate what you need from the role that might have been lacking before is a sensible process to go through.

You should plan the specifics of the job role, how it fits into your business vision, what skills you need, how you culture will work for you to attract talent and so forth.

Once you have a plan in place and have got cracking then the process needs to be smooth, with regular communication between you and the candidates and time set aside to dedicate to the process.

This will mean that when you find your perfect candidate, you are able to keep them engaged and get them in front of the team within days of submitting their application and show you are a proactive and organised business.

If you know they’re good, then remember that it’s likely they will be a star candidate for other job vacancies too. So, act quickly and if you don’t have anyone else to compare them to, it may be that you won’t have time to run a longer, robust process in order to have other candidates to square them up against. Be confident that they are right for the role and get them in the bag.

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Be flexible with your offer

It would be a great shame to have planned and executed your hiring process and found your star candidate only then discover that what you’re offering them isn’t enough to convince them to accept your job.

Candidates expect fair remuneration, generous benefits, interesting perks and flexible working to name a few!

If you are going to risk losing a great candidate because you don’t match up to what others in your sector are offering, then it may be time to revise your offer package.

Even if you are on a tight budget, there are still things you can do to swing the balance – such as offering a few extra days holiday, contributions towards travel costs or investing in softer benefits that add to your overall offering.

After all, if a candidate has the potential to boost your business productivity and increase your bottom line, then finding ways to bring them over the line will be well worth the effort.

If you need any recruitment advice or guidance, get in touch:+44 203 538 5311 or email: talent@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

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10 inappropriate questions interviewers need to stop asking!

According to new research, the vast majority of organisations have asked candidates inappropriate and potentially illegal questions during a job interview.

Researchers of the study found that 85% of interviewers have asked questions such as ‘Are you physically fit and healthy’, ‘Have you any plans to start a family’ or ‘Did you grow up outside of the UK’.

All of the above questions are potentially breaching the law, which requires all potential employers to treat candidates fairly.

It’s true though however that many interviewers could be completely unaware that what they think is innocent questioning could be a legal grey area, with 47% saying they have never had official training on what questions to ask in an interview.

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Below are the top 10 inappropriate interview questions that hiring managers have asked:

  • What year did you graduate? (59%)
  • What year were you born? (55%)
  • Do you have any children? (56%)
  • Are you physically fit and healthy? (53%
  • Are you in a relationship or married? (51%)
  • Have you got any plans to start a family? (42%)
  • Where is your accent from? (46%)
  • Will you need flexible time for family life? (46%)
  • Did you grow up outside of the UK? (45%)
  • Will you need time off during half term? (43%)

This highlights the need for training for any person involved in the process of interviewing prospective candidates, so they know what is and isn’t acceptable in the recruitment process.  Ensuring all prospective employees are given a fair and honest opportunity to secure a job based on their skills and ability not their gender, personal choices or maternity/paternity choices.

If you need any HR help, advice or tips on interviewing, get in touch:+44 203 538 5311 or email: talent@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

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FRIDAY FAQS – Can an employer ask about my mental health when applying for a new job?

Thanks to awareness days like Wednesday’s World Mental Health Day, the conversation surrounding mental health is getting louder. The stigma attached to talking about our mental health in the same way that we do for our physical health is being lifted and with that there is a growing acceptance that it’s okay not to be okay and to seek support.

The workplace is undeniably an environment that for many people can cause stress and anxiety. If you have a mental health issue then being in a pressured working environment, that may not be supportive of your mental health, can cause further damage to your health and overall well-being.

It’s therefore the role of employers to ensure they have fair practices in place with regards to their approach for identifying and supporting their teams with mental health issues, just as they do for physical health.

As an employee you should expect to be supported by your employer and provided with the necessary support for a mental health issue.

However, is it a concern for those seeking new employment that if they have an existing mental health issue, it may impact upon their likelihood of getting a job?

We want to help debunk some of these crucial questions and shed light on an area of HR that is vital for a happy and productive workplace.

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1. Can I be asked about my mental health issue when I apply for a job? 

In short, no. It’s unlawful for an employer to ask a candidate if they have a history mental health issues during the application process.

If you are asked about your mental health, you are not obliged to answer this, however, if you do choose to disclose this information it is recommended that you do so honestly.

Asking candidates health questions before a job offer is made is unlawful and can be reported to the Equality Advice and Support Service.

If you are asked about your mental health during the application process and then don’t receive an offer, you may want to challenge this as it can be classed as discrimination on the grounds of disability.

2. Are there situations when an employer can ask about my mental health before making a job offer?

There are a few situations when an employer may need to ask about your health before a job offer is made, these can include:

  • To find out if you can take an assessment for a job.
  • To find out if you need reasonable adjustments to the application process.
  • To find out whether you will be able to do the requirements of the job, whilst they also consider any reasonable adjustments that may need to be made.
  • To find out if applications are coming from a diverse group of people.
  • To establish if you have the particular disability required for the job.
  • To assess you for national security purposes.

For example, a lawful question about your health and whether this affects your ability to do the job would be; if you were applying for a job erecting scaffolding and the employer asked questions at the application stage regarding disability, health and whether the applicant has a fear of heights.

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3. What questions can I be asked about my mental health once I’ve been offered a job?

Once you receive a job offer then your new employer is lawfully able to ask you questions about your health.

If your new employer asks questions about your mental health and subsequently becomes concerned due to a mental health issue you may not be able to carry out your job, then it is the employer’s responsibility to seek further advice from your doctor or occupational health.

Should your new employer ask a question about your mental health and then withdraw the job offer without first consulting advice or conducting a further assessment or investigation, then this may be seen direct discrimination and therefore unlawful.

Mental Health is a really important HR issue in the workplace and If you need any help or advice on how to approach it, get in touch:+44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

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6 reasons why employees quit their jobs

When you think about why employees leave jobs, you may be quick to assume that it is money that is the main driver, but in reality money is much less of an issue than personal factors and as an employer surely the number one priority for the continued success of your business is finding out why your employees are leaving.

When one of your employees hands in their notice, finding out why could be the key to discovering whether something is remiss within your business, i.e. a manager that people aren’t happy with, or heavy and demanding workloads.

On the other hand, they could be leaving for a job at a different company. Why is that? You need to ask yourself, what are they doing better? and why is working for them more appealing than working for you?

If you know why an employee is leaving you can then start to gather valuable information that could boost your recruitment and retention practices.

Below we list 6 reasons why employees quit their jobs:

1. Feeling undervalued

All employees want to feel that they are making a positive contribution in the job they do and more importantly that they are appreciated.

It might be interesting to know that this doesn’t necessarily mean giving rewards or salary raises, although I’m sure nobody would complain!! Often, a simple ‘thank you’ is a powerful way of changing someone’s perspective.

2. Insufficient management

If employees don’t feel that they’re being managed effectively, they may look for jobs elsewhere. People won’t always get along, but if an employee is struggling to connect with their manager then there will be difficulties in the workplace.

However, if many people are finding one manager particularly difficult to work with, then this could indicate a rather bigger issue.  Sometimes, the opposite is true, a manager could be a good friend to everyone on their team, but might struggle with delegating, communicating and keeping projects on track.

3. No progression prospects

Most employees will want to feel that they can progress in their role, inspiring them to work hard so they can be rewarded with promotions and pay rises.

New challenges are valued. It can be demotivating for workers to feel that they’re trapped at their current level, with no room to grow and improve. They might be tempted to leave if they feel they aren’t progressing, especially if they have opportunities being offered to them from another business who offer great career development.

Be aware though that some employees will be happy in their current positions and not want to be continually pushed to progress.  For them, promising promotion opportunities could be just as likely to make them feel pressured and inclined to leave. Your main aim is to know what each employee wants, so it is a good idea to make sure you discuss these in performance reviews.

Always bear in mind that a lack of progression ambition does not indicate a lazy or unmotivated employee, some people are simply happy with their current level of responsibility.

4. No work/life balance

A good work/life balance is now more important than ever, especially as we are connected to our smartphones and laptops 24/7, sometimes, no amount of money is worth certain sacrifices, early mornings, long days at work, hours travelling to and from work, people need and value their free time.

Many employers are finding solutions that benefit everyone, such as offering on-site facilities: gyms, coffee shops, childcare facilities and customised office spaces, to help bring the work/life balance into the workplace.

5. Colleague clashes

Being in an workplace environment where employees feel they are among friends can make all the difference to job satisfaction.

If an employee spends every day clashing with a colleague, either because they don’t get on, feel they are not pulling their weight or have very different opinions about how the work should be done, then there’s a disaster waiting to happen.

You might want to step in and mediate. If you can’t identify the problem and help resolve it, then there’s a good chance that someone will be leaving.

6. Lack of work enjoyment

Of course personal tastes and preferences change, at every stage of life, what you may have aspired too at 23 maybe very different at 40.

Some people decide after years in the workplace that they are ready for something new, while others spend a couple of months in a role and realise that they’ve made a mistake.

There are very few things that you can do to retain an employee with a different path in mind, but it might be worth seeing what alternative jobs you can offer if you would really like to keep them within your business.

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At HR Revolution we understand what it takes to create a great team, and as experts in HR we are well placed to support you with the first steps towards achieving a competitive business through your people.

So if you are looking for recruitment solutions that go beyond simply hiring your newest team member get please get in touch +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

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Do you need to recruit new talent?

Are you looking to recruit some of the fabulous new talent that will be entering the job market in the form of University graduates and college leavers?  If the answer is yes, then make sure you have got your basics in order, or here’s how it could all go wrong!

Hiring a new employee is pretty straight forward; but only if it is handled correctly. Many employers however can get it so wrong, which as we know is unproductive for any working environment.

A recent survey has shown that the No.1 reason for it all going so wrong is “not managing the candidate experience”.  This may sound a little fluffy if you do not work in HR or Recruitment, but it basically comes down to communication.  It is important to keep in constant contact with the candidate, providing them with quality information and feedback and remembering that honesty is the best policy. Providing a poor candidate experience can have many negative consequences including damaging comments about your company and lack of faith in the overall brand.

Other reasons the recruitment process can fail are:

  1. Expecting dull job descriptions to attract the right people – This is your chance to sell the position and entice the highest calibre of staff, if you waste this opportunity they will be looking to work for your competitors.
  2. Not taking advantage of employee referrals – a referral means they are pre-screened.  The best companies place nearly 50% of staff through referrals.
  3. Not fully understanding the actual job – If you don’t understand about the job you want them to do, how can you sell it to them or even know if they are capable of performing it?
  4. Using the same recruiting process for different level jobs – High level jobs require a different level of service, knowledge and relationship building. If you want the best out there, they definitely want to be treated that way too.
  5. Making slow hiring decisions – The best candidates are gone quickly, and will probably have more than one offer on the table, you simply can’t afford to hang around.
  6. Assuming interviews are accurate – Interviews are traditionally weak predictors, so poorly executed or generic interviews that do not challenge the candidate, will result in poor hires and put off the right people.
  7. Just using job boards – Only posting jobs on an advertising site means that 75% of the workforce that are not ‘actively’ looking will NOT see them. Make sure that your jobs can be found on various sites.
  8. Not prioritising jobs – Make sure if you are looking for more than one employee that you get the right person first, there is no point getting an assistant if you don’t have the manager.
  9. Not identifying job acceptance criteria – Do you know what the perfect candidates needs to accept the job? If you don’t, they won’t join you.

One last thought… With so many people getting it wrong, why don’t you let HR Revolution get it right for you.  First time.

 

If you would like to discuss any HR issues, please give HR Revolution a call we’d love to help, call us on +44 203 538 5311 or email: info@hrrevolution.co.uk

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Fri fun… 10 things NEVER to do or say in an interview

On my way into work this morning, I noticed a big festive recruitment drive by Tesco – there is no getting away from it now Christmas is coming! Talking of Tesco, here are a few festive facts from them which amazed me –  did you know they will sell 170,000 turkeys, 140,000 jars of cranberry sauce and over 400,000 packs of Brussels sprouts!  So safe to say they will be recruiting a lot of people over this period, so I thought it would be fun to have a list of 10 things never to say or do in an interview, just in case you fancy getting a seasonal job…. not based on personal experience I might add…

Seriously these things do happen and I’m sure they make the decision not to employ a very easy one!!!

  1. Don’t ever answer a call or text in an interview, make sure your phone is switched off and in your bag.
  2. Never swear in an interview, you must remain professional at all times.
  3. Ask for a lift home after the interview.
  4. Smell your armpits on the way into the interview, or indeed during or after.
  5. Tell the interviewer you were fired for beating up your last boss!! not sure this reflects too well on your character.
  6. When one applicant was offered food before the interview he declined, saying that he didn’t want to line his stomach with grease before going out drinking.
  7. A candidate for an accounting position said she was a “people person,” not a “numbers person.”
  8. Applicant took out a hair brush and brushed her hair mid-interview.
  9. Being late.  I think its safe to say your interviewer will not be impressed, whatever excuse you may come up with, punctuality is key.
  10. Ask what is the annual leave and sickness policy is, this will set alarm bells ringing for the interviewer.

I have to say, numbers 3 and 4 are my personal favourites and actually made me laugh out loud picturing it happening!

Remember, the job market is very competitive these days, so don’t ruin your prospects with an ill-chosen comment.

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Be prepared – 5 killer interview questions and why you should ask them…

Here at HR Revolution we are no strangers to conducting a few interviews, some on behalf of our clients for various different roles and some internally for us, but whoever it is, one thing I’m sure of is that the person sitting across the table in an interview is more nervous than we are!!

So, we want to help you, the interviewee to calm your nerves and be confident, and the biggest part of that is being prepared. Your potential employer, will pick up very quickly whether you have come prepared by asking lots of questions about the company like, “so tell me what you know about us?” or “what did you think of our website?” or maybe, “who do you think our biggest competitors are?” and of course they would, they want to know that you are genuinely interested in working for them. This leads me nicely on to one of the most important question they will ask you… “Have you got any questions for me?”…

This one question will really show whether or not you really want to be part of their team, so please do not answer like this… “no I think you’ve already answered all my questions” or even worse just sit there like a bowl of jelly spluttering out the odd “err” and “um” followed by “nope, all good”!! What are you thinking!!! The interviewer has just seen how unprepared you are, and no matter how good your experience, you just don’t cut the mustard! So, let us help you.

Stand out from the crowd and ask questions that show you’ve prepared. To get you started, HR Revolution have compiled 5 questions that we would liked to be asked:

  1. How would a member of your team describe working here?
    How the interviewer answers gives a good insight into the company culture and working practices, it should fill you with enthusiasm, if not you have to question if this really is the right role for you.
  2. If I’m successful what will my first month look like?
    Shows that you are keen to get off to a great start in reaching your objectives and helps you determine how the good the onboarding process is.
  3. What makes someone successful in your team?
    This will give you a good idea of what your new employer is expecting of you in your new roll and it should be a good indicator of how they would like to see you perform and what you should be concentrating on.
  4. Can you explain how performance will be measured for this role?
    Shows that you understand and accept that you will have responsibilities that you will be accountable for and that you want to succeed.
  5. What do you like most about working for this company?
    Helps you get a better insight into what it’s like to work at the company. If the interviewer can’t answer this straight away, then maybe warning bells should sound.  They should love a question like this, as it will give them a chance to talk about themselves on a personal level and why they love their employer! After all you don’t you want to work with people that love what they do!!

Good luck, this is your chance to demonstrate you have given the company and role real thought and hopefully leave the interview with a great impression of yourself as the right candidate for the job.

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5 abilities you should look for in all employees…

At HR Revolution we pride ourselves on recruiting great employees and talent, even if I do say so myself! Here are the top 5 qualities we look for in individuals regardless of job role:

1. Positive Job Attitude

An employee’s enthusiasm for their job shines through, to managers, to employees and to clients. It is desirable for every employer to have employees that know what they are doing and enjoy what they are doing. This is one of the strongest elements that an interviewee can convey to a potential employer at an interview; their passion is something a CV can’t always portray.  If an employee is visually enthusiastic about learning everything there is to know about their particular job, this person will go far. A strong work ethic also impacts on the morale of fellow co-workers

2. Good Problem Resolution Skills

Every job role comes up against problems, it’s inevitable.  The scale of these problems can vastly vary according to the level of the role, but never the less as employees we all need to have some degree of problem resolution ability. Solving problems are a big part of every job and having skilled problem solvers in the workplace is a valuable asset and should be looked upon and appreciated as such. How do you solve common and not so common problems in the workplace?  Does the employee keep a cool head while in the solving process?

3. Conflict Resolution Ability

How employees deal with conflict inside the work place is one thing that reveals their overall attitude.  Does the employee get involved in multiple work place relation conflicts? If so, then why?  Does this employee get along with just about everyone they come into contact with?  How they resolve minor professional conflicts will also give you a perspective as to how they will fare in more serious conflict resolutions.

4. High Quality of Work

Errors, mistakes, mishaps whatever you call them, can be costly in business. We are all human and as humans we do on occasion make mistakes, but a good employee will learn to reduce mistakes to a minimum, through a combination of careful reviewing, double checking and experience. But high levels of quality can be a combination of accuracy, attention to detail, work experience, good research and a positive job attitude and pride in the work they produce.  The quality of the finished material is an important factor in seeing what their overall work ethic is.

5. Adaptability

The ability to adapt to situations, new tasks, unexpected changes in tasks and work load and the general changes every workplace experiences is a vital ability for all employees. All businesses change, the world is changing all the time and good employees will have the ability to manage change, through a natural ability or a learned one. Without adaptability we become the person on.

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Looking to recruit some fresh new talent…

Are you looking to recruit some of the fabulous new talent that has recently entered the market?  If the answer is yes, then make sure you have got your basics in order, or here’s how it could all go wrong!

Hiring a new member of staff is pretty straight forward; but only if it is handled correctly. Many employers however can get it so wrong, which as we know is unproductive for any working environment.

A recent survey has shown that the No.1 reason for it all going so wrong is “not managing the candidate experience”.  This may sound a little fluffy if you do not work in HR or Recruitment, but it basically comes down to communication.  It is important to keep in constant contact with the candidate, providing them with quality information and feedback and remembering that honesty is the best policy. Providing a poor candidate experience can have many negative consequences including damaging comments about your company and lack of faith in the overall brand.

Other reasons the recruitment process can fail are:

  1. Expecting dull job descriptions to attract the right people – This is your chance to sell the position and entice the highest calibre of staff, if you waste this opportunity they will be looking to work for your competitors.
  2. Not taking advantage of employee referrals – a referral means they are pre-screened.  The best companies place nearly 50% of staff through referrals.
  3. Not fully understanding the actual job – If you don’t understand about the job you want them to do, how can you sell it to them or even know if they are capable of performing it?
  4. Using the same recruiting process for different level jobs – High level jobs require a different level of service, knowledge and relationship building. If you want the best out there, they definitely want to be treated that way too.
  5. Making slow hiring decisions – The best candidates are gone quickly, and will probably have more than one offer on the table, you simply can’t afford to hang around.
  6. Assuming interviews are accurate – Interviews are traditionally weak predictors, so poorly executed or generic interviews that do not challenge the candidate, will result in poor hires and put off the right people.
  7. Using Job boards alone – Only posting jobs on an advertising site means that 75% of the workforce that are not ‘actively’ looking will NOT see them. Make sure that your jobs can be found on various sites.
  8. Not prioritising jobs – Make sure if you are looking for more than one employee that you get the right person first, there is no point getting an assistant if you don’t have the manager.
  9. Not identifying job acceptance criteria – Do you know what the perfect candidates needs to accept the job? If you don’t, they won’t join you.

A final thought… With so many people getting it wrong, why don’t you let HR Revolution get it right for you the first time, download our free guide to recruiting talent below….

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Invited to an interview? 8 tips on what NOT to do!

Has anyone been watching “The job interview” on Channel 4? No… well if you are looking for a job, you should, it is a fantastic guide on what NOT to do in an interview!  Ok, I’m being a little unfair as there have been a couple of people who came across very genuine and likeable, even if a little out of practice at interviewing. There are some though, that seriously just need to a) get some manners and b) use a bit of common sense!

We have blogged before with interview tips and do’s and don’ts, but for those that missed it, here are our top tips on what not to do if you want to land your dream job.

  1. Don’t be late – We shouldn’t really need to tell you this as everyone knows this is probably one of the worst things you can do;  first impressions and all that.  So do whatever it takes to arrive in plenty of time, even if that means being ridiculously early and going and grabbing a coffee somewhere to prepare. That leads me on to the next point…
  1. Not being prepared! There really is no excuse for this, the internet is a wonderful thing and there is literally nothing you can’t find on it, company size, organisation charts, company turnover and most importantly a companies ethos. Remember they will ask you questions based on it, so do your homework.  And please, please, please, remember the name of who is interviewing you!  Sound silly, well in one episode of the above mentioned programme the interviewer asked “what’s my name” to which the interviewee replied “err, ooh I’m sure I know it, I’m not very good and retaining information”… Really!!!
  1. Don’t underestimate the power of body language – after all it is telling the interviewer a story of its very own! I bet your mum told you to sit up straight and not swing on your chair, and she was right! You need to look interested and engaged not lazy and uninterested. Enter with a smile, a firm (but not aggressive) handshake and maintain steady eye contact, and watch for how they are reacting to you, as they are giving off signals too.
  1. Don’t tell porkies! Of course you want to showcase yourself, but remember to do this based on the skills you have and not those you don’t. For example, don’t tell them you are fluent in French when really you scraped a C in your GCSE, how embarrassing would it be when they strike up a conversation and all you can manage is Oui Oui mon petit fleur! The chances are if you land the job you will be asked to demonstrate these wonderful skills and if they aren’t quite as true as you have said, well you’re going to look a bit silly aren’t you?!?!
  1. Don’t go on and on and on and … oh you get the picture. Keep your answers short and relevant and know the point you are trying to make, if you just ramble on for the sake of saying something, the interviewer will quickly switch off and you will forget what you were answering in the first place. Preparation before the interview will help you have some answers ready prepared, allowing you to speak clearly with confidence.
  1. Don’t be rude… Like I tell my kids, pay attention when someone is talking to you! Checking your watch or your phone constantly is just not acceptable behaviour. And just think about the way you are talking and how it is coming across; don’t interrupt and be argumentative if you don’t agree with something just listen and formulate your response appropriately.
  1. Don’t insult or criticise your current employer. It really is not professional to talk about how rubbish your boss is, what they do wrong or why you hate them so just don’t do it. If they ask you why you are looking to move jobs, talk about the positives of the new position or career progression, not about how you can’t wait to get out where you are “cos it does your head in!”.
  1. Not asking any questions – Please, whatever you do, don’t make “what is the salary and holiday allowance” the first one!  Interviews are as much for you to decide whether you want to work for that company, as it is for them to see if you are right for the role.  So again be prepared and have some well thought out questions ready; some examples might be asking what they are looking for in the new hire, or how do you see the company growing and how will this role contribute to that? They show that you are genuinely interested in being part of and contributing to a growing business.

Lastly I would say, be yourself, if you get the job surely you want to know that was partly down to them liking you as a person as well as your skills, try and be a bit more confident in the interview and show some of your winning personality.

And a parting note, make sure you follow up. I’m not suggesting you start becoming their stalker but an email to thank them for their time, reiterate that you are the right candidate for the job and you’re happy to answer any further questions… Just don’t come across too desperate.

We hope the above tips are helpful, so good luck and go nail that interview!

Why not download below our FREE guide “21 commonly asked interview questions” and be as prepared as you possibly can.

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