Our new website has launched…

We are excited to announce our new and improved website has been launched…

We’ve listened to our clients and customers and made some key changes.

We our proud that we take an innovative approach to HR, cutting through the industry jargon to help make a real difference to any business, by providing excellent HR consultancy and HR support.

We know HR can be a scary prospect for businesses both big and small and there is a lot to take in.  However we ask questions that other HR consultancies don’t, because we want to make a positive impact on your business and understand your people, by providing excellent HR and Talent services in the form of employee documentation, support, management and advice regarding employment queries and processes.

Come and take a look:

Website Launch 1 - hr revolution - outsourced hrIf there are any of our services that you would like to discuss in more detail or
might be interested in then please give us a call on: +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

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FRIDAY FAQS – Can an employer ask about my mental health when applying for a new job?

Thanks to awareness days like Wednesday’s World Mental Health Day, the conversation surrounding mental health is getting louder. The stigma attached to talking about our mental health in the same way that we do for our physical health is being lifted and with that there is a growing acceptance that it’s okay not to be okay and to seek support.

The workplace is undeniably an environment that for many people can cause stress and anxiety. If you have a mental health issue then being in a pressured working environment, that may not be supportive of your mental health, can cause further damage to your health and overall well-being.

It’s therefore the role of employers to ensure they have fair practices in place with regards to their approach for identifying and supporting their teams with mental health issues, just as they do for physical health.

As an employee you should expect to be supported by your employer and provided with the necessary support for a mental health issue.

However, is it a concern for those seeking new employment that if they have an existing mental health issue, it may impact upon their likelihood of getting a job?

We want to help debunk some of these crucial questions and shed light on an area of HR that is vital for a happy and productive workplace.

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1. Can I be asked about my mental health issue when I apply for a job? 

In short, no. It’s unlawful for an employer to ask a candidate if they have a history mental health issues during the application process.

If you are asked about your mental health, you are not obliged to answer this, however, if you do choose to disclose this information it is recommended that you do so honestly.

Asking candidates health questions before a job offer is made is unlawful and can be reported to the Equality Advice and Support Service.

If you are asked about your mental health during the application process and then don’t receive an offer, you may want to challenge this as it can be classed as discrimination on the grounds of disability.

2. Are there situations when an employer can ask about my mental health before making a job offer?

There are a few situations when an employer may need to ask about your health before a job offer is made, these can include:

  • To find out if you can take an assessment for a job.
  • To find out if you need reasonable adjustments to the application process.
  • To find out whether you will be able to do the requirements of the job, whilst they also consider any reasonable adjustments that may need to be made.
  • To find out if applications are coming from a diverse group of people.
  • To establish if you have the particular disability required for the job.
  • To assess you for national security purposes.

For example, a lawful question about your health and whether this affects your ability to do the job would be; if you were applying for a job erecting scaffolding and the employer asked questions at the application stage regarding disability, health and whether the applicant has a fear of heights.

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3. What questions can I be asked about my mental health once I’ve been offered a job?

Once you receive a job offer then your new employer is lawfully able to ask you questions about your health.

If your new employer asks questions about your mental health and subsequently becomes concerned due to a mental health issue you may not be able to carry out your job, then it is the employer’s responsibility to seek further advice from your doctor or occupational health.

Should your new employer ask a question about your mental health and then withdraw the job offer without first consulting advice or conducting a further assessment or investigation, then this may be seen direct discrimination and therefore unlawful.

Mental Health is a really important HR issue in the workplace and If you need any help or advice on how to approach it, get in touch:+44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

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FRIDAY HR FAQs – How can you as an employer promote gender equality in your business?

Gender equality is a very hot topic at the moment and will be for many months if not years to come especially with big national companies such as the BBC failing to fulfill their responsibilities to promote it.  Also with many employees now increasingly looking for it in their own workplace, how can you make sure you are meeting their expectations?

1. Have fair recruitment policies

When recruiting for a role, it is important to make sure that your job adverts don’t include anything that might alienate potential applicants. This could mean including gendered language such as ‘salesman’ or ‘Barmaid’. Instead make sure that your Job Description is objective and focuses on the specific qualifications and skills required for the person to fill the role.

Similarly at interview stage it is important for hiring managers to be trained in equal opportunities, diversity, interview skills and avoiding unconscious bias. Ensure they understand your selection criteria and they don’t ask questions which may come across as biased.

2. Introduce Remote and Flexible working

In today’s digital world, remote working is becoming more acceptable and parents can enjoy the benefits of working whilst also being able to support with childcare. This way of working is a great way of showing your employees that you understand it is difficult to balance a career and children at the same time e.g. allowing flexible working hours for those who need to leave earlier for the school run etc.

Diverse friends holding checkmark icons
Diverse friends holding checkmark icons

3. Assist with child support and incentivise Paternity Leave

As a business owner you could consider helping to pay for child support and elderly care or ensure you have a set of family friendly policies in place for employees when your employees need extra support. Or you could look into incentivising paternity leave for dads, if fathers have additional paternity leave, this allows them to have some valued bonding time with their newborns, whilst allowing mothers to take less time off work.

4. Be transparent about pay

It is also a good idea to explain how your business determines salaries and pay increases from the outset and ensure that promotions and rewards are fair. As a business owner, you must make sure that these are not in favour of male employees or those that are able to work over and above the standard business hours, so that everyone has a fair chance of receiving a promotion, reward, or salary increase.

By promoting an equal and positive work environment that rewards those who do their role well; your employees will see that working within your company supports their lifestyle and you will ultimately gain their loyalty.

If you need any HR advice or guidance, please get in touch: +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

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How to work efficiently from home

As technology becomes ever more erudite and employees demand more work-life balance, many companies are implementing remote working policies.  However, even though it might seem like your local Pret or Costa is packed with people tapping away on their laptops, still 35% of businesses do not offer the option of working from home.

One in four people who are not currently offered remote working choices said they would consider changing jobs if they found a role which offered working from home, so if you are one of the 35% you may want to look into it.

How to work effectively from home 1 - HR Revolution - Outsourced HR

Working from home has become more popular than ever while people try and redress the work-life balance.  So here are a few guidelines on how to best to work from home, whilst being productive and getting the most out of your day.

  1. Make a to-do list to keep yourself accountable. Being organised is crucial if you’re to avoid spending the day wandering around the house or surfing the internet!
  2. Some people who work from home love the fact they can answer emails in their PJs however many advocate getting showered and dressed as normal to maintain a feeling of professionalism…
  3. Be firm with friends who have time on their hands and who may overlook the fact that just because you’re working from home, it doesn’t mean you can take a break anytime you like.
  4. Invest in a comfortable office chair so you don’t have an excuse to keep getting up to stretch your legs. This is important for your physical health too. If you have the resources, create an office space that you genuinely enjoy spending time in – and banish clutter!
  5. If you want to separate home from the office and prefer to work from a coffee shop make sure the documents you need are accessible by storing them in the cloud e.g. in Google Drive or Dropbox, but please be mindful of your surroundings if you are working on something of a sensitive nature!
  6. Define your working hours if your job allows for it and if you prefer starting and finishing work earlier or later do so, but stick to a schedule.

Lastly, it’s good to be mindful that if you work remotely, you won’t be as visible. Make sure that your colleagues realise you are still part of the team, so make sure you check in with the office a couple of times a day, even scheduling meetings via Skype or conference call avoiding lowering your profile in the workplace.

If you need any advice, please get in touch with us to find out more:+44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

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Putting a few HR myths to bed…

At HR Revolution, we’ve heard our fair share of HR myths and misinformation, so we thought we would list below the most common ones and why they are just that…

Employees don’t have a contract unless there is something in writing

A contract of employment is an agreement between an employer and employee whether it is verbal or in writing. Once work has commenced the employment relationship has been forged. A full contract of employment does not need to be given writing to make the agreement legally binding, however it is worth bearing in mind that it is a legal requirement for an employer to provide at least a statement of written particulars to an employee within one month of starting.

You can’t make a pregnant employee redundant

Yes you can. However it must be a fair procedure, you have to be very careful that there is no risk of discrimination in the selection process. Also be mindful that once a pregnant employee goes on maternity leave, they have extra legal protection by having first option on any available positions that they are qualified to do if placed at risk of redundancy. Make sure you take HR advice!!!

 No one can take you to tribunal without two years’ service

It is a common misconception among employers that dismissing an employee who does not have two years of service will mean that they are “safe” from an employment tribunal claim.  But an employee can and for a range of reasons such as discrimination related to any of the nine protected characteristics, like underpayment of wages of the National Living Wage or National Minimum Wage, breach of working-time regulations in terms of holiday pay or a breach of contract.

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I can decide if I want someone to be self-employed

No, there are strict rules for deciding the status of people in a business. It is unhelpful that HMRC and employment law rules are different in deciding if someone is an employee, a worker or self-employed as the recent cases of Uber and Pimlico Plumbers can attest!

You don’t have to give part-time employees the same benefits as full-time employees

Part-time employees must suffer no disadvantage, so must have the same benefits as full-time employees. Many benefits can be pro-rated for part-time employees, such as holiday allowance.

Casual and zero-hour employees do not get holiday

All employees and workers accrue statutory holiday from day one. This is 5.6 weeks prorated to hours worked.

I am not able to contact sick employees

Not at all, as an employer you have a ‘duty of care’ to keep in touch with a sick employee when they are signed-off to see how they are. However, this doesn’t entail daily calls and emails as this could lead to a harassment case. Also, regular contact should not just focus on their return to work, but their well-being and if any realistic adjustments could be implemented to help their return.

So there you have it a few HR myths debunked…

If you need and HR advice or guidance give HR Revolution a call and see how we could help: +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

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How to manage maternity leave in a small business

When an employee announces their pregnancy, of course you’re all smiles, you congratulate them, you’re happy for them.

However, you’re now faced with issues surrounding maternity leave and businesses are expected to take this in their stride. The truth is, things are never that simple, especially for small businesses, maternity leave is a predominantly concerning challenge.

You risk losing a key employee for a significant amount of time. You can’t just replace them, because they’ll need to come back once they’ve comfortably settled into motherhood. You may need to pay them for not working for you, whilst paying someone else to do their job.

You might need to recruit someone new, invest in training and hope that they keep things on track. You need to keep everything running smoothly.

Something we would most definitely advise is to be supportive, having a flexible approach to employment can help ensure that talented, experienced and productive employees remain with your business after the birth of their child.

You’ve heard the term fail to plan etc, well it really does apply with maternity leave.

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The key to managing a positive maternity experience is effective planning and good communication throughout.  Things don’t always go to plan, of course things can change after the child is born; so start planning as soon as your employee tells you she is pregnant. Make sure all important information about their role is written down and ask them to help write a clear job description when looking for replacements.

Here are some essential facts to get you started and make sure that you are not breaking any employment laws:

Pregnant employees have four main legal rights:

  • Maternity leave
  • Maternity pay or maternity allowance
  • Paid time off for antenatal care
  • Protection against unfair treatment, discrimination or dismissal

Other maternity rights

Notice of pregnancy

Employees must tell their employer about the pregnancy at least 15 weeks before the beginning of the week the baby is due. If this isn’t possible (for example, they didn’t know they were pregnant) the employer must be told as soon as possible. Employees must also tell the employer when they want to start their Statutory Maternity Leave and Statutory Maternity Pay.

Maternity Leave

Eligible employees can take up to 52 weeks’ statutory maternity leave (26 weeks’ ordinary maternity leave and 26 weeks’ additional maternity leave). They don’t have to take the full 52 weeks’ but they must take 2 weeks leave after the baby is born (4 weeks if the work in a factory). This can begin, but not before, 11 weeks before the expected week of birth.

Pregnancy-related illnesses

Maternity leave and Statutory Maternity Pay will start automatically if the employee is off work for a pregnancy-related illness in the 4 weeks before the baby is due, and this supersedes what has been previously agreed.

Maternity Pay

Eligible employees can claim up to 39 weeks of statutory maternity pay (90% of their average weekly earnings before tax for the first six weeks, then 33 weeks at £138.18 per week or 90% of their average weekly earnings, whichever is lower).

employment law changes

Some employers may offer more generous leave and pay conditions and this should be included in the employees contract terms or Employee Handbook. Employers pay SMP to the employee, and businesses whose total annual National Insurance contributions are less than £45,000 can claim all of it back plus 3%. This is deducted from tax payable to HM Revenue & Customs.

Whilst on leave

Staying in touch is extremely important and there are 10 statutory KIT (keeping in touch) days available, which are a great way to make an employee still feels part of your business.  They are paid for coming in, without it affecting their SMP and can be used for training, actual work or even business social events and are a great way of easing their journey back to work. These days however, are not mandatory and an employee should not be made to feel that they must use them.

Return to work advice

A phased return to work at the end of maternity leave is probably a very good idea, as the reality is there will have been significant changes for them in their new role as a parent and probably your business since they’ve been away.

There are lots of other things to think about with the maternity process and we have only covered a few basics for you; there are health and safety issues to think about, as well as eligibility for SMP (Statutory Maternity Pay) and what documents you need to send and receive to name a few.

There are so many aspects of employment rights in respect of maternity leave and pay, flexible working requests, holiday entitlement, pension contributions, whether the employee keeps the mobile phone or company car, keeping in touch days etc, it is definitely worth considering professional help to make sure you have everything covered and compliant and HR Revolution can help you do just that.

If you would like to discuss further or get any advice please do get in touch: call +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

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Is your HR planning on track?

You might have blinked and missed the first quarter of 2018 and while it may seem like five minutes have passed since you mapped out your big goals at the end of last year, it’s actually a good time to stop, take stock and refocus.

Ask yourself honestly, have you successfully met your HR obligations during the first quarter, or are you lagging behind? Of course it’s undeniable that other things can get in the way, but if you want to be compliant and you want your business to thrive, then it’s absolutely vital that you take time to get your people practices right.

Need some pointers around where to get started? Here’s our checklist for assessing whether your HR planning is on track.

1. Have you made provisions for new legislation?

It can be hard to keep up with changes in employment law, but it’s absolutely non-negotiable. Neglect this area and your business could seriously pay the price, you must regularly be pinpointing relevant changes, and making adjustments to your policies and practices accordingly.

2. Is your paperwork in order?

Having a paper trail of key HR decisions might seem like a dull admin task, but if you don’t put some time into creating and filing the right documents, then you may live to regret it. If you run into any problems, your paperwork could make a huge difference to how you rectify the situation.

3. Have employees had performance discussions?

If you only discuss performance with your employees once a year, then you’re seriously missing out on many opportunities. Encouraging your team to thrive should be part of day-to-day processes, but at the very least, formal conversations should be carried out and recorded once a quarter.  Take a look at our effective performance review documents ready to use for your own business.

4. Have you planned the summer holiday schedule?

The second quarter tends to be the time when employees start to think about booking their summer leave. The weather’s getting warmer, and everyone wants to enjoy a little downtime. Make sure that you update any policies that you might have if necessary and consider operational demands in advance.

5. Have you identified training needs?

Some of your employees may need to brush up on their knowledge and skills to keep moving towards your goals. Work out where the gaps are and create your plan so you know exactly what you’re going to do about it. The options are plentiful, and include formal training, coaching, mentoring, job shadowing, and more.

6. Have your managers been brought up to speed with your priorities?

It’s pointless setting wider strategic goals if you aren’t going to make sure that the right people are on board and know how their work plays a part. The end of the quarter is a good time to bring your management team together for a catch-up and refresh.

7. Have you collected feedback from your employees?

Identifying potential issues before they get out of hand could save you headaches later in the year. An employee survey could be a great option here. Just make sure that you act on your findings!

8. Have you arranged a discussion with your payroll provider?

The end of the quarter coincides with the end of the financial year, so if you outsource your payroll, it makes sense to have a chat with your provider so you can ensure that you’re both on the same page. There may be loose ends that need to be tied up, and it’s always best to action these matters in a timely fashion.

9. Have you commissioned an HR audit?

It can sometimes be hard to take a critical look at your own operations. You might feel inclined to brush tricky issues under the carpet, especially if you’re not quite sure how to tackle them, so why not let HR Revolution carry out an HR audit – it is an ideal way to assess the set up and compliance of your HR function.

After reading through the checklist, you might have realised that you missed the mark at least once or twice when it comes to keeping your people practices in order.  When you are running a business, you’ve got a lot of plates you need to keep spinning; between acquiring new customers and clients, managing the finances, and everything else that needs your attention, HR can sometimes get put on the backburner.

However, HR isn’t just another task to add to your to-do list, it can have a real and very tangible impact on your bottom line and at the most basic level, it can ensure that you don’t face costly damaging legal cases against your business. Embrace it, as its full potential could increase your profits, create a much happier and more productive workforce, and help you to smash through your strategic goals.

So isn’t it time that you started giving your HR practices the dedication that they really deserve? If you know that you need to make the change, but you’re not sure what to do first, then get in touch with HR Revolution, we can help you to establish a plan of action that will get your business to where you want and need it to be.

Get in touch: +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.

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Employment tribunal cases rise after fee abolished

The Ministry of Justice has just released its latest round of data on tribunals, since fees were scrapped last summer.

The number of single claims has almost doubled since fees were found unlawful, with receipts, disposals and caseload outstanding increasing by 90%, 21% and 66% respectively in the three months to December 2017, compared with the same quarter in 2016.

Multiple employment tribunal claims received have increased by 467% – mainly due to a surplus of holiday pay cases that were presented in 2017 but not the year before.

Some 8,173 single claims were filed with the tribunal system over the three months to December 31st, a 16% increase compared to the previous quarter and the highest level seen since the third quarter of 2013.  The total number of cases, both single and multiple claims, rose 32% compared with the previous three month period.

Just under 3,000 single claims per month has become the new normal, the sharp rise seems more dramatic when compared to a relatively low number before fees were abolished.

Of the total claims accepted during the quarter, almost a quarter (22%) were for unlawful deduction of wages, around 13% were equal pay claims, 7.5% breach of contract and 3% sex discrimination.

The stats also show that from the launch of the fee refund scheme in October 2017 to 31 December 2017, 4,800 applications for refunds were received and 3,400 payments made, with a total value of £2.8m.

This upward trend is likely to continue for the next 12 months, but claim numbers would be unlikely to exceed the levels they did prior to fees being introduced.  This is primarily because of the Acas early conciliation scheme, which was introduced at the same time as the fee regime and remains in place.  This makes it mandatory to explore conciliation before lodging a claim and there is no doubt that this has reduced the number of claims making it through.

Employers will be increasingly wary of a claim being brought when handling HR issues.  As always, prevention is better than cure and having a robust set of employment policies in place and training on key areas such as sickness absence and equality will go some way towards mitigating the risks.  Remember, small issues can escalate to big and costly issues very quickly.

If you would like any practical advice or guidance please get in touch and see how we can help: call +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

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A version of this article first appeared on hrmagazine.co.uk

Think you wouldn’t benefit from an outsourced HR service? 4 ways we can help you save money

Thinking your business could do with some help with issues that are bubbling away under the surface, but wondering whether you really can spare the budget to outsource?

Is it easier just hoping for the best and carrying on as you are?

We know that it can be scary to make that leap and bring in some HR help, but the reality is that we can often actually SAVE you money.

And that’s an astute investment to make in your business.

Outlined below are just a few of the ways in which we could help you reduce your costs…

1. We can keep you out of tribunals

It’s easy to fall into the trap of thinking that because you’re a fair employer who tries to do your best by all your employees, that you’re not at risk of having to face a tribunal. This isn’t necessary true though.

Employment law is complicated, and if you miss something, you could find yourself with a potentially very costly situation on your hands. We can make sure that your people practices are on the right side of the law.

2. We can increase the performance of your workforce

Imagine if you could double the output of your workforce overnight. Realistically, that’s probably not going to happen, however, HR Revolution can dive deep into your business, pinpoint the exact issues that are at play, and create a step-by-step plan to fix them.

This could increase your productivity and make sure that your employees are firing on all cylinders. You might think that a marketing budget, or some social media tactics are going to give you the edge. But the real breakthrough happens when you look INSIDE your business, rather than outside.

3. We can educate your managers

We don’t just come into your business, work some temporary magic, and then leave. We provide on-site services and can give your managers the skills to ensure that they’re playing an active role in driving your business forward. This means less of a learning curve, less mistakes, and more strides forward.

Your employees are the most important investment that you can make, so it makes sense to nurture that investment. If you know that your managers have room for improvement, take responsibility and talk to us to get things moving in the right direction.

4. We can provide a flexible, pick-and-mix service

Maybe you’re not quite at the stage where you need full-time, permanent HR help. That’s exactly why we can assist you; we don’t tie you into ridiculously long contracts that you don’t need, we can create a bespoke package that’s perfect for your needs.

Just what you really need to move forward and solve your problems, right now. Our aim is to make you a better employer, not tie you up with unnecessary bureaucracy.

HR Revolution can save you money, and can seriously add to your bottom line. Get in touch, call +44 203 538 5311 or email: hello@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

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How to manage gender reassignment in the workplace – Part 3

In yesterday’s blog we discussed disclosing gender identities, so in this blog we cover how to support your employees and what changes you can make in the workplace.

Managing changeover of an employee’s personal details:

Terminology – You should ask the employee how they wish to be addressed. If the employee is in agreement inform their colleagues and ensure they use the correct terminology.

Documentation – Employer and employee should agree what details need to be changed i.e personal records, access passes etc. A discussion of what will happen to previous records relating to gender should take place to ensure confidentiality is maintained.

Appearance and dress code – A gender neutral dress code could be applied or if not appropriate the employee should be able to follow the dress code in a way which best fits their gender identity.

Toilet, changing and shower facilities –  An employee should never be segregated and told to use particular facilities but be allowed to use those they feel best match their identity following gender reassignment.

Dealing with a sensitive gender identity matter – Issues such as names and/or gender not matching their passport/ID need to be handled sensitively whilst still ensuring the company is compliant in its checks.  Having a third party a business can turn to, to handle these issues can be reassuring for both employer and employee.

Company health insurance scheme – To ensure trans employees are treated fairly, it is recommended for an employer to include treatments and procedures for gender reassignment in its scheme.

Absence from work because of gender reassignment – It is discriminatory to treat an employee, who is absent from work to undergo gender reassignment, less favourably. Depending on an employer’s policy for managing absence, they may wish to record absences due to gender reassignment, but shouldn’t include them in ‘absence triggers’. It may be worth considering if you offer limited special leave (at your discretion) which maybe paid or unpaid

Performance – It is recommended to make allowances for the trans employee’s job performance during transition and a short period afterwards, as surgery is likely to have temporary side effects.  An employee may ask to move to another role or change some duties which may cause difficulties whilst they transition or they may request a phased return to work, wherever possible this should be considered and catered for.

Trans and mental health – A person questioning their gender may experience mental health problems such as anxiety and depression. An employer can support the employee, by providing a welcoming and safe environment at work.

Support an employee with a family member transitioning – It is a type of direct discrimination to treat an employee less favourably than another because of the gender reassignment of someone they are associated with. The impact on an employee with a family member who is transitioning can be considerable; therefore you should treat them with sensitivity and provide them with support such as time off.

Develop trans inclusive policies  – Trans inclusive policies will need to be rolled out. Matters covered should include:

  • Transitioning at work including leave and pay
  • Dress code
  • Toilet, changing and shower facilities
  • Employee’s personal records and how these will be dealt with
  • If possible how an employee can transition to another role/department
  • How an employee should report any gender reassignment discrimination
  • Unacceptable behaviour towards employees inclusive of those of non-binary identities
  • Maternity/paternity/adoption/shared parental leave

These processes are always best supported by HR and it may be advisable to outsource your projects where possible. HR Revolution can carry out any project to ensure the process is performed unbiasedly.

If you need further information or guidance, give HR Revolution a call +44 203 538 5311 or email: info@hrrevolution.co.uk or visit www.hrrevolution.co.uk  where our expert CIPD HR professionals are waiting to help you with any questions you may have.

HR Revolution; supporting you, your employees AND your business.