Workplace predictions for 2017

Ok, so it may have been the first day back in the office for many today and believe me I so wanted to turn off the alarm at 7am and just turn over and go back  to sleep!!!  But getting back into the work routine isn’t so bad and I find I’m excited by what is in store for HR Revolution in 2017 and my part in it’s journey.

Looking ahead, I came across this interesting article on 5 predictions of how our working lives may change in 2017.  Food for thought for the coming year…

1. New talent will be harder to come by than evershutterstock_155549147

UK unemployment has hit its lowest level in 11 years, at 4.8% and there’s a shortage of people for many significant roles. Companies are finding it difficult to attract talented new people and will find 2017 harder to keep their employees.

Garnering staff feedback will be crucial in ensuring that employees are happy, and that changes can be made.

2. Everyone will be more vocal

The race to find the best and most talented employees, mean companies will have to showcase their employer brand and with an increasing number of employees speaking up about both the strengths and weaknesses of the business, it will be imperative that employers need to take constructive criticism on board. 

Employees feel the have got something to say and they want to be taken seriously.

2017new

3. Employees will insist on greater flexibility

Technology allows many workers to have the ability of getting things done from anywhere, and with the constant delays and strikes, commuting has become a stressful and miserable experience for many of us. Over the course of 2017, it is inevitable that more and more people will be requesting to work from home some of the time, and that companies must listen and take this on board to keep their employees happy.

4. Millennials will drive companies to success

Recent research highlighted that 83% of millennials, Generation Y or Generation Me as they are also know, disagree that people should spend years in a role before expecting a promotion regardless of status and performance. They are driven and don’t’ want to wait for what they’re working towards, so employers will need to ensure that their employees have a clear career path and feel valued if they want to hold on to them.

5. A comeback for the work/life balance

Since technology has evolved, it has become increasingly common for people to check their work emails late at night and run work errands over the weekend. While this is not likely to change, there will be more of a balance when it comes to leaving work at work in 2017.

worklifebalance1Some years ago companies experimented with a ‘no email day’. That didn’t really work because emails are such an integral part of our working lives that it wasn’t really practical.  However, responsible employers are now becoming concerned that we haven’t got the balance right and that it’s a contributing factor to staff sickness and stress in the workplace.  Could the UK follow France, who’s government has introduced legislation giving workers the right to disconnect from work emails outside office hours…  I’m sure many UK employees would welcome this change…

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A version of this article was first published on HR Grapevine

3 thoughts on “Workplace predictions for 2017

  1. Interesting predictions. I’ve also written about employee engagement, particularly with regard to employer brand playing an important role in 2017 (prediction 2). A comeback for the work/life balance I can see also!

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